Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/22145
Title: A population-based analysis of attributable hospitalisation costs of invasive fungal diseases in haematological malignancy patients using data linkage of state-wide registry and costing databases: 2009 - 2015.
Austin Authors: Valentine, Jake C;Morrissey, C Orla;Tacey, Mark A ;Liew, Danny;Patil, Sushrut;Ananda-Rajah, Michelle
Affiliation: Department of Infectious Diseases, Alfred Health and Central Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Malignant Haematology and Stem Cell Transplantation Service, Alfred Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Radiation Oncology
Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Malignant Haematology and Stem Cell Transplantation Service, Alfred Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
General Medicine Unit, Alfred Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Olivia Newton-John Cancer Wellness and Research Centre
Issue Date: Feb-2020
metadata.dc.date: 2019-12-04
Publication information: Mycoses 2020; 63(2): 162-171
Abstract: Invasive fungal diseases (IFD) are associated with significant treatment related costs in patients with haematological malignancies (HM). The objectives of this study were to characterise the gross and attributable hospitalisation costs of a variety of IFD in patients with HM by linking state-wide hospital administrative and costing datasets. We linked the Victorian Admitted Episodes Dataset, Victorian Cancer Registry and the Victorian Cost Data Collection from 1st July 2009 to 30th June 2015. IFD-cases and uninfected controls were matched 1:1 based on age within ten-years, same underlying HM and length of stay prior to IFD diagnosis. The cost difference between surviving cases and controls, indexed to 2019 Australian dollars (AUD) calculated twelve-months from IFD diagnosis, was determined using Poisson and negative binomial regression (NBR). From 334 matched-pairs, the gross hospitalisation cost of cases was AUD$67,277 compared to AUD$51,158 among uninfected controls, associated with an excess median hospitalisation cost of AUD$16,119 (p<0.001) attributable to IFD, approximating to USD$11,362 and €10,154 at purchasing power parity. Median attributable costs were highest for patients with invasive aspergillosis (AUD$55,642; p<0.001) and mucormycosis (AUD$51,272; p=0.043) followed by invasive candidiasis AUD$24,572 (p<0.001). No change in median excess attributable costs was observed over the study period (p=0.90) Analyses by NBR revealed a 1.36-fold increase (p<0.001) in total hospitalisation costs among cases as compared to controls twelve-months from IFD diagnosis. Invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis have high attributable hospitalisation costs but the overall excess IFD cost of AUD$16,119 is modest, potentially reflecting missed or miscoded fungal episodes arguing for better quality surveillance data at hospital level.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/22145
DOI: 10.1111/myc.13033
PubMed URL: 31715052
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Invasive fungal disease
data linkage
health economics
hospitalisation costs
surveillance
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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