Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/22082
Title: Assessment of longitudinal hippocampal atrophy in the first year after ischemic stroke using automatic segmentation techniques.
Austin Authors: Khlif, Mohamed Salah;Werden, Emilio ;Egorova, Natalia;Boccardi, Marina;Redolfi, Alberto;Bird, Laura ;Brodtmann, Amy 
Affiliation: The Florey Institute for Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
Laboratory of Alzheimer's Neuroimaging and Epidemiology (LANE), IRCCS Istituto Centro San Giovanni di Dio Fatebenefratelli, Brescia, Italy
LANVIE-Laboratory of Neuroimaging of Aging, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
Laboratory of Neuroinformatics, IRCCS Istituto Centro San Giovanni di Dio Fatebenefratelli, Brescia, Italy
Department of Neurology, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
The Florey Institute for Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
Issue Date: 22-Oct-2019
metadata.dc.date: 2019-10-22
Publication information: NeuroImage. Clinical 2019; 24: 102008
Abstract: We assessed first-year hippocampal atrophy in stroke patients and healthy controls using manual and automated segmentations: AdaBoost, FIRST (fsl/v5.0.8), FreeSurfer/v5.3 and v6.0, and Subfields (in FreeSurfer/v6.0). We estimated hippocampal volumes in 39 healthy controls and 124 stroke participants at three months, and 38 controls and 113 stroke participants at one year. We used intra-class correlation, concordance, and reduced major axis regression to assess agreement between automated and 'Manual' estimations. A linear mixed-effect model was used to characterize hippocampal atrophy. Overall, hippocampal volumes were reduced by 3.9% in first-ever stroke and 9.2% in recurrent stroke at three months post-stroke, with comparable ipsi-and contra-lesional reductions in first-ever stroke. Mean atrophy rates between time points were 0.5% for controls and 1.0% for stroke patients (0.6% contra-lesionally, 1.4% ipsi-lesionally). Atrophy rates in left and right-hemisphere strokes were comparable. All methods revealed significant volume change in first-ever and ipsi-lesional stroke (p < 0.001). Hippocampal volume estimation was not impacted by hemisphere, study group, or scan time point, but rather, by the interaction between the automated segmentation method and hippocampal size. Compared to Manual, Subfields and FIRST recorded the lowest bias. FreeSurfer/v5.3 overestimated volumes the most for large hippocampi, while FIRST was the most accurate in estimating small volumes. AdaBoost performance was average. Our findings suggest that first-year ipsi-lesional hippocampal atrophy rate especially in first-ever stroke, is greater than atrophy rates in healthy controls and contra-lesional stroke. Subfields and FIRST can complementarily be effective in characterizing the hippocampal atrophy in healthy and stroke cohorts.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/22082
DOI: 10.1016/j.nicl.2019.102008
PubMed URL: 31711030
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Freesurfer
Hippocampal atrophy
Linear mixed-effect model
Magnetic resonance imaging
Stroke
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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