Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/16647
Title: Measurement of physical activity levels in the Intensive Care Unit and functional outcomes: an observational study
Austin Authors: Beach, Lisa J;Fetterplace, Kate;Edbrooke, Lara;Parry, Selina M;Curtis, Rachel;Rechnitzer, Thomas;Berney, Susan C ;Denehy, Linda
Affiliation: Department of Physiotherapy, Melbourne Health, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Department of Clinical Nutrition, Melbourne Health, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Department of Physiotherapy, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Melbourne Health, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Department of Physiotherapy, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: Aug-2017
metadata.dc.date: 2017-04-07
Publication information: Journal of Critical Care 2017; 40: 189-196
Abstract: PURPOSE: Primary aims were: (1) objectively quantify levels of physical activity with the sensewear armband mini-fly motion sensor (SWA-MF), (2) evaluate the correlation of SWA-MF measurement of active and resting energy expenditure against the ICU Mobility scale (IMS) and indirect calorimetry respectively. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Adults mechanically ventilated ≥48h and anticipated to remain in ICU≥5days were included. Physical activity (PA) was measured using a SWA-MF (over the first five days); energy expenditure was measured with both the SWA-MF and the Deltatrac II metabolic cart on day three; highest level of mobility was assessed on the IMS. RESULTS: Fifty-five participants performed median [IQR] 16.8 [0.6-152.4] minutes of PA per day (defined as >1.0 metabolic equivalent). A strong correlation between active energy expenditure and highest level of mobility (IMS), r=0.76, p=0.00 was observed on day 5. The SWA-MF demonstrated moderate to good agreement with the Deltatrac II metabolic cart (n=20), intra-class correlation co-efficient=0.71 (p=0.00) for the measurement of energy expenditure on day 3. CONCLUSIONS: Participants demonstrated low levels of PA. Motion sensors may be a promising non-invasive measure of energy expenditure and further investigation is warranted.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/16647
DOI: 10.1016/j.jcrc.2017.04.006
PubMed URL: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28431343
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Critical care
Functional outcomes
Mobilisation
Physical activity
Physical therapy
Rehabilitation
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

Show full item record

Page view(s)

2
checked on Nov 30, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in AHRO are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.