Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12422
Title: Improving glucose tolerance by reducing weight gain in a polygenic obese mouse model: use of a high protein diet.
Austin Authors: Blair, Amy R;Strube, M L;Proietto, Joseph ;Andrikopoulos, Sofianos
Affiliation: The University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine (Austin Health), Austin Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: 8-Oct-2014
Publication information: Hormone and Metabolic Research = Hormon- Und Stoffwechselforschung = Hormones Et Me´tabolisme 2014; 47(3): 184-93
Abstract: Diets to decrease body weight have limited success in achieving and importantly maintaining this weight loss long-term. It has recently been suggested that energy intake can be regulated by the amount of protein ingested, termed the protein leverage hypothesis. In this study, we determined whether a high protein diet would be effective in achieving and maintaining weight loss in a genetically obese model, the New Zealand Obese (NZO) mouse. NZO and C57BL/6J (C57) control mice were fed a high protein or chow diet for 5 weeks from weaning (3 weeks of age). Body weight and food intake were determined. Mice on the same diet were bred to produce offspring that were fed either a chow or high protein diet. Body weight, food intake, and glucose tolerance were determined. Feeding NZO and C57 mice a high protein diet for 5 weeks resulted in reduced food intake and consequently energy intake and body weight gain compared with mice on a chow diet. NZO mice fed a high protein diet showed a significant improvement in glucose tolerance compared with their chow-fed counterparts, while no difference was seen in C57 mice fed chow or protein diet. The offspring of NZO mice that were fed a high protein diet during gestation and weaning were also lighter and displayed improved glucose tolerance compared with chow fed animals. We conclude that a high protein diet is a reasonable strategy to reduce body weight gain and improve glucose tolerance in the NZO mouse, a polygenic model of obesity.
Gov't Doc #: 25295419
URI: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12422
DOI: 10.1055/s-0034-1389991
Journal: Hormone and metabolic research = Hormon- und Stoffwechselforschung = Hormones et métabolisme
URL: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25295419
Type: Journal Article
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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