Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/29703
Title: Hemispheric cortical atrophy and chronic microglial activation following mild focal ischemic stroke in adult male rats.
Austin Authors: Ermine, Charlotte M;Nithianantharajah, Jess;O'Brien, Katrina;Kauhausen, Jessica A;Frausin, Stefano;Oman, Alexander;Parsons, Mark W;Brait, Vanessa H;Brodtmann, Amy ;Thompson, Lachlan H
Affiliation: Eastern Cognitive Disorders Clinic, Eastern Health, Monash University, Clayton, VIC, Australia..
The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health
Melbourne Brain Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia..
Department of Neurology, University of New Wales South Western Clinical School, Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW, Australia..
Neurology
Issue Date: Dec-2021
Date: 2021
Publication information: Journal of neuroscience research 2021; 99(12): 3222-3237
Abstract: Animal modeling has played an important role in our understanding of the pathobiology of stroke. The vast majority of this research has focused on the acute phase following severe forms of stroke that result in clear behavioral deficits. Human stroke, however, can vary widely in severity and clinical outcome. There is a rapidly building body of work suggesting that milder ischemic insults can precipitate functional impairment, including cognitive decline, that continues through the chronic phase after injury. Here we show that a small infarction localized to the frontal motor cortex of rats following injection of endothelin-1 results in an essentially asymptomatic state based on motor and cognitive testing, and yet produces significant histopathological change including remote atrophy and inflammation that persists up to 1 year. While there is understandably a major focus in stroke research on mitigating the acute consequences of primary infarction, these results point to progressive atrophy and chronic inflammation as additional targets for intervention in the chronic phase after injury. The present rodent model provides an important platform for further work in this area.
URI: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/29703
DOI: 10.1002/jnr.24939
ORCID: 0000-0003-4726-1120
0000-0001-8536-5241
0000-0003-2632-0304
0000-0002-3501-1143
0000-0002-0877-8496
0000-0002-0911-355X
0000-0001-9466-2862
Journal: Journal of neuroscience research
PubMed URL: 34651338
PubMed URL: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34651338/
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: RRID:AB_10711153
RRID:AB_2811075
RRID:AB_566455
RRID:SCR_002798
RRID:SCR_017654
brain infarction
endothelin-1
microglia
neurodegeneration
stroke
touchscreen
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