Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/25749
Title: Longitudinal Accumulation of Cerebral Microhemorrhages in Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Disease.
Austin Authors: Joseph-Mathurin, Nelly;Wang, Guoqiao;Kantarci, Kejal;Jack, Clifford R;McDade, Eric;Hassenstab, Jason;Blazey, Tyler M;Gordon, Brian A;Su, Yi;Chen, Gengsheng;Massoumzadeh, Parinaz;Hornbeck, Russ C;Allegri, Ricardo F;Ances, Beau M;Berman, Sarah B;Brickman, Adam M;Brooks, William S;Cash, David M;Chhatwal, Jasmeer P;Chui, Helena C;Correia, Stephen;Cruchaga, Carlos;Farlow, Martin R;Fox, Nick C;Fulham, Michael;Ghetti, Bernardino;Graff-Radford, Neill R;Johnson, Keith A;Karch, Celeste M;Laske, Christoph;Lee, Athene K W;Levin, Johannes;Masters, Colin L ;Noble, James M;O'Connor, Antoinette;Perrin, Richard J;Preboske, Gregory M;Ringman, John M;Rowe, Christopher C ;Salloway, Stephen;Saykin, Andrew J;Schofield, Peter R;Shimada, Hiroyuki;Shoji, Mikio;Suzuki, Kazushi;Villemagne, Victor L ;Xiong, Chengjie;Yakushev, Igor;Morris, John C;Bateman, Randall J;Benzinger, Tammie L S
Affiliation: UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology, Dementia Research Centre and UK Dementia Research Institute, London WC1 3BG, United Kingdom
Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA
Florey Institute and The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia
Columbia University Irving Medical Center, Department of Neurology, New York, NY 10032, USA
UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology, Dementia Research Centre and UK Dementia Research Institute, London WC1 3BG, United Kingdom
Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology and Immunology, Department of Neurology, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA
Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN, USA
Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Neurology, Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA
Butler Hospital, Memory and Aging Program, Brown University Alpert Medical School, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Providence, RI 02906, USA
Indiana University School of Medicine, Indiana Alzheimers Disease Research Center and IU Center for Neuroimaging, Department of Radiology and Imaging Science, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA
Neuroscience Research Australia, Sydney, NSW 2031, Australia
School of Medical Sciences, UNSW Sydney, Sydney NSW 2052, Australia
Osaka City University, Clinical Research Center for Dementia, Osaka, Japan
Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Hirosaki, Japan
The University of Tokyo, Department of Neurology, Tokyo, Japan
Washington University School of Medicine, Division of Biostatistics, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA
German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) Munich; Department of Neurology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich; Munich Cluster for Systems Neurology (SyNergy), Munich, Germany
Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA
General Hospital, Department of Neurology, Boston, MA 02114, USA
Aging Brain, Department of Neurology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA
Neuroscience Research Australia, Sydney, NSW 2031, Australia
University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology, Dementia Research Centre and UK Dementia Research Institute, London WC1 3BG, United Kingdom
University of Sydney, Departments of Molecular Imaging and Neurology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA
Mayo Clinic, Department of Neurology, Jacksonville, FL 32216, USA
Banner Alzheimers Institute, Phoenix, AZ 85006, USA
Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA
Instituto de Investigaciones Neurológicas Fleni, Department of Cognitive Neurology and Neuropsychology, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA
Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN 55905, USA Eric McDade, Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA Jason Hassenstab, Washington University School of Medicine, Departments of Neurology and Psychological and Brain Sciences, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA Tyler M. Blazey, Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA Brian A. Gordon, Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Departments of Neurology and Clinical and Translational Science, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA Guoqiao Wang, Washington University School of Medicine, Division of Biostatistics, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA Kejal Kantarci, Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN 55905, USA Clifford R. Jack, Jr.,
Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimers Disease and the A
Massachusetts General Hospital, Departments of Radiology and Neurology, Boston, MA 02114, USA
Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA
German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) Tübingen, Section for Dementia Research, Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research and Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany
Butler Hospital, Memory and Aging Program, Brown University Alpert Medical School, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Providence, RI 02906, USA
German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) Munich, Germany
Department of Neurology, Ludwig-MaximiliansUniversität München, Munich; Munich Cluster for Systems Neurology (SyNergy), Munich, Germany
Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Neurology, Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA
Butler Hospital, Memory and Aging Program, Brown University Alpert Medical School, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Providence, RI 02906, USA
Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA
Indiana University School of Medicine, Center for Neuroimaging, Department of Radiology and Imaging Science, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA
Molecular Imaging and Therapy
Issue Date: 23-Mar-2021
metadata.dc.date: 2021-01-25
Publication information: Neurology 2021; 96 (12): e1632-1645
Abstract: To investigate the inherent clinical risks associated with the presence of cerebral microhemorrhages (CMHs) or cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) and characterize individuals at high risk for developing hemorrhagic amyloid-related imaging abnormality (ARIA-H), we evaluated longitudinally families affected by dominantly inherited Alzheimer disease (DIAD). Mutation carriers (n=310) and non-carriers (n=201) underwent neuroimaging, including gradient echo MR sequences to detect CMHs, neuropsychological, and clinical assessments. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses evaluated relationships between CMHs and neuroimaging and clinical marker of disease. Three percent of non-carriers and eight percent of carriers developed CMHs primarily located in lobar areas. Carriers with CMHs were older, had higher diastolic blood pressure and Hachinski ischemic scores, and more clinical, cognitive, and motor impairments than those without CMH. APOE-ε4 status was not associated with the prevalence or incidence of CMHs. Prevalent or incident CMHs predicted faster change in clinical dementia rating although not composite cognitive measure, cortical thickness, hippocampal volume, or white matter lesions. Critically, the presence of two or more CMHs was associated with a significant risk for development of additional CMHs over time (8.95±10.04 per year). Our study highlights factors associated with the development of CMHs in individuals with DIAD. CMHs are a part of the underlying disease process in DIAD and are significantly associated with dementia. This highlights that in participants in treatment trials exposed to drugs, which carry the risk of ARIA-H as a complication, it may be challenging to separate natural incidence of CMHs from drug related CMHs.
URI: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/25749
DOI: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000011542
ORCID: 0000-0002-9735-5152
0000-0002-5125-8226
0000-0001-7833-616X
0000-0002-0276-2899
0000-0003-0602-6319
0000-0002-6854-5547
0000-0002-1376-8532
0000-0003-2967-9662
0000-0003-1027-1712
0000-0002-7729-1702
PubMed URL: 33495373
Type: Journal Article
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

Show full item record

Page view(s)

50
checked on May 17, 2021

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in AHRO are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.