Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/23278
Title: Sleep education for healthcare providers: Addressing deficient sleep in Australia and New Zealand.
Authors: Meaklim, Hailey;Jackson, Melinda L;Bartlett, Delwyn;Saini, Bandana;Falloon, Karen;Junge, Moira;Slater, James;Rehm, Imogen C;Meltzer, Lisa J
Affiliation: Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health, School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria
Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health, School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800.
School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Plenty Rd, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia
National Jewish Health, 1400 Jackson Street, G311, Denver, CO, USA
Institute for Breathing and Sleep, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Clinical Skills Centre and Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, The University of Auckland, New Zealand
School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Plenty Rd, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia
The Sleep Health Foundation, 114/30 Campbell Street, Blacktown NSW 2148, Australia
Woolcock Institute of Medical Research & University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
Sydney Pharmacy School, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009, Australia
Issue Date: 15-May-2020
EDate: 2020-05-15
Citation: Sleep health 2020; online first: 15 May
Abstract: Deficient sleep has been recognized as a current health crisis in Australia and New Zealand, contributing to the increased prevalence and severity of chronic diseases and mental health issues. However, all healthcare disciplines currently receive limited training in addressing deficient sleep, which is contributing to the current health crisis. This narrative review considers the following: (1) the prevalence and burden of deficient sleep in Australia and New Zealand; (2) the limited sleep education in healthcare training programs; (3) healthcare providers' lack of knowledge and evidence-based clinical practice in sleep disorders; (4) sleep-focused education initiatives for healthcare providers; (5) an action agenda for improved sleep education for healthcare providers. Both domestic and international sleep initiatives are considered, as is the role of general practitioners (primary care physicians), pediatricians, psychologists, pharmacists, and nurses. Three key themes emerge and guide action: (1) relevant training for students from all healthcare disciplines; (2) continuing professional development for practicing healthcare providers; and (3) translation of evidence-driven best practice into clinical practice. To achieve this sleep education agenda, the sleep community must form and strengthen partnerships across professional associations, public health agencies, and education providers. By improving education and clinical practice in sleep, we will equip healthcare providers with the knowledge and skills needed to address deficient sleep in Australia and New Zealand.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/23278
DOI: 10.1016/j.sleh.2020.01.012
PubMed URL: 32423774
Type: Journal Article
Review
Subjects: Education
Healthcare
Physician education
Sleep
Sleep disorders
Training
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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