Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/16360
Title: Cough augmentation in subjects with duchenne muscular dystrophy: comparison of air stacking via a resuscitator bag versus mechanical ventilation
Austin Authors: Toussaint, Michel;Pernet, Kurt;Steens, Marc;Haan, Jurn;Sheers, Nicole 
Affiliation: Ziekenhuis Inkendaal, Vlezenbeek, Belgium
Victorian Respiratory Support Service, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Institute for Breathing and Sleep, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: Jan-2016
Date: 2015-10-06
Publication information: Respiratory Care 2016; 61(1): 61-67
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Air stacking improves cough effectiveness in people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and respiratory muscle weakness. However, it is not known whether air stacking is more effective via a resuscitator bag or a home ventilator. METHODS: This prospective randomized study investigated the effect of air stacking via a volume-cycled home ventilator versus via a resuscitator bag in participants with DMD. Maximum insufflation capacity and peak expiratory flow during spontaneous (cough peak flow) and air stacking-assisted cough maneuvers (air stacking-assisted cough peak flow) were measured. RESULTS: Fifty-two adult DMD subjects receiving noninvasive ventilation were included in the study: 27 participants performed air stacking via their home ventilator (home-ventilator group; age = 25.3 ± 5.1 y; forced vital capacity (FVC) = 809 ± 555 mL), and 25 participants used a resuscitator bag (resuscitator-bag group; age = 24.7 ± 5.7 y, FVC = 807 ± 495 mL). Following a single training session, air stacking could be performed successfully by 89% (home ventilator) and 88% (resuscitator bag) of participants. There were comparable maximum insufflation capacities (1,481 mL for the home-ventilator group vs 1,344 mL for the resuscitator-bag group, P = .33) and mean air stacking-assisted cough peak flow values (199 L/min for the home-ventilator group vs 186 L/min for the resuscitator-bag group, P = .33) between techniques. Air stacking-assisted cough peak flow increased significantly compared with baseline in both groups (mean increase: +51% [home ventilator] vs +49% [resuscitator bag], P < .001), with individual air stacking-assisted cough peak flow improvements ranging from -20 to 245%. CONCLUSIONS: Cough augmentation is an important component of the respiratory management of people with a neuromuscular disorder. No difference in cough effectiveness as measured by air stacking-assisted cough peak flow was found in air stacking via a ventilator compared with via a resuscitator bag. Both methods achieved mean air stacking-assisted cough peak flow values of >160 L/min. Provision of an inexpensive resuscitator bag can effectively improve cough capacity, and it is simple to use, which may improve access to respiratory care in people with DMD.
URI: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/16360
DOI: 10.4187/respcare.04033
Journal: Respiratory Care
PubMed URL: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26443018
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Air stacking
Airway clearance
Chest physiotherapy
Cough
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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