Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/35325
Title: Perfect Enough to Sleep? Perfectionism and Actigraphy-Determined Markers of Insomnia.
Austin Authors: Oh, Susie Y;Meaklim, Hailey J ;Nicholas, Christian L;Cunnington, David;Schenker, Maya;Patrick, Cameron J;Windred, Daniel;Phillips, Lisa J
Affiliation: Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia.;Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health, Monash University Healthy Sleep Clinic, Monash University, Clayton, Australia.
Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia.
Sunshine Coast Respiratory and Sleep, Sunshine Coast, Australia.
Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia.
Statistical Consulting Centre, School of Mathematics and Statistics, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia.
Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health, Monash University Healthy Sleep Clinic, Monash University, Clayton, Australia.
Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia.
Institute for Breathing and Sleep
Issue Date: 24-May-2024
Date: 2024
Publication information: Behavioral Sleep Medicine 2024-05-24
Abstract: Perfectionism is an important factor in insomnia development and maintenance. Previous studies exploring the relationship between perfectionism and insomnia have predominantly relied on self-reported sleep measures. Therefore, this study sought to assess whether actigraphy-measured sleep parameters were associated with perfectionism. Sixty adults (85% females, mean age 30.18 ± 11.01 years) were sampled from the Australian general population. Actigraphy-derived objective sleep measures, subjective sleep diary measures, the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (FMPS), Hewitt-Flett Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (HFMPS) and Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale 21 (DASS-21) were collected. High perfectionism levels were associated with poor sleep, but these relationships differed between objective and subjective measures. Perfectionism via FMPS total score and subscales of Concern over Mistakes, Doubts about Actions, Personal Standards and Self-oriented Perfectionism correlated with subjective sleep onset latency and sleep efficiency with moderate effects (r = .26 to .88). In contrast, perfectionism via HFMPS total score and subscales of Socially Prescribed Perfectionism and Parental Expectations predicted objective sleep onset latency and sleep efficiency. Additionally, stress mediated the relationships between objective sleep efficiency and Concern over Mistakes and Doubts about Actions. Perfectionism demonstrated stronger associations with subjective than objective sleep measures. Higher Parental Expectations and Socially Prescribed Perfectionism may increase one's vulnerability to objectively measured poor sleep. Therefore, perfectionism may be important in preventing and treating insomnia.
URI: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/35325
DOI: 10.1080/15402002.2024.2355476
ORCID: 0009-0008-8145-9038
0000-0003-0448-3567
0000-0002-3837-3609
0000-0002-8403-0420
0000-0003-3811-2940
0000-0002-4677-535X
0000-0002-7461-7498
0000-0003-1060-6068
Journal: Behavioral Sleep Medicine
Start page: 1
End page: 16
PubMed URL: 38785108
ISSN: 1540-2010
Type: Journal Article
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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