Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/35179
Title: Effects of furosemide, acetazolamide and amiloride on renal cortical and medullary tissue oxygenation in non-anaesthetised healthy sheep.
Austin Authors: Ow, Connie P C;Okazaki, Nobuki;Iguchi, Naoya;Peiris, Rachel M;Evans, Roger G;Hood, Sally G;May, Clive N;Bellomo, Rinaldo ;Lankadeva, Yugeesh R
Affiliation: Preclinical Critical Care Unit, Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Department of Anesthesiology and Resuscitology, Okayama University, Okayama, Japan.
Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan.
Cardiovascular Disease Program, Biomedicine Discovery Institute and Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Department of Critical Care, Melbourne Medical School, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Research Centre (ANZIC-RC), School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.;Department of Intensive Care, Austin Hospital, Melbourne, Australia.;Department of Intensive Care, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Australia.
Preclinical Critical Care Unit, Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.;Department of Critical Care, Melbourne Medical School, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Data Analytics Research and Evaluation (DARE) Centre
Issue Date: 29-Mar-2024
Date: 2024
Publication information: Experimental Physiology 2024-03-29
Abstract: It has been proposed that diuretics can improve renal tissue oxygenation through inhibition of tubular sodium reabsorption and reduced metabolic demand. However, the impact of clinically used diuretic drugs on the renal cortical and medullary microcirculation is unclear. Therefore, we examined the effects of three commonly used diuretics, at clinically relevant doses, on renal cortical and medullary perfusion and oxygenation in non-anaesthetised healthy sheep. Merino ewes received acetazolamide (250 mg; n = 9), furosemide (20 mg; n = 10) or amiloride (10 mg; n = 7) intravenously. Systemic and renal haemodynamics, renal cortical and medullary tissue perfusion and PO2${P_{{{\mathrm{O}}_{\mathrm{2}}}}}$ , and renal function were then monitored for up to 8 h post-treatment. The peak diuretic response occurred 2 h (99.4 ± 14.8 mL/h) after acetazolamide, at which stage cortical and medullary tissue perfusion and PO2${P_{{{\mathrm{O}}_{\mathrm{2}}}}}$ were not significantly different from their baseline levels. The peak diuretic response to furosemide occurred at 1 h (196.5 ± 12.3 mL/h) post-treatment but there were no significant changes in cortical and medullary tissue oxygenation during this period. However, cortical tissue PO2${P_{{{\mathrm{O}}_{\mathrm{2}}}}}$ fell from 40.1 ± 3.8 mmHg at baseline to 17.2 ± 4.4 mmHg at 3 h and to 20.5 ± 5.3 mmHg at 6 h after furosemide administration. Amiloride did not produce a diuretic response and was not associated with significant changes in cortical or medullary tissue oxygenation. In conclusion, clinically relevant doses of diuretic agents did not improve regional renal tissue oxygenation in healthy animals during the 8 h experimentation period. On the contrary, rebound renal cortical hypoxia may develop after dissipation of furosemide-induced diuresis.
URI: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/35179
DOI: 10.1113/EP091479
ORCID: 0000-0001-5402-1809
Journal: Experimental Physiology
PubMed URL: 38551893
ISSN: 1469-445X
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: acetazolamide
amiloride
furosemide
hypoxia
renal oxygenation
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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