Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/35162
Title: The identification of an optimal body size parameter to adjust skeletal muscle area on chest CT in COVID-19 patients.
Austin Authors: Kutaiba, Numan ;Dobson, Julie E ;Finnis, Mark;Bellomo, Rinaldo 
Affiliation: Department of Radiology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
Radiology
Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Research Centre, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.;Melbourne Medical School, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.;Melbourne Medical School, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
Department of Critical Care, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.;Department of Intensive Care, Austin Hospital, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia.;Data Analytics Research and Evaluation Centre, Austin Hospital, Melbourne, Australia.;Department of Critical Care, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Australia.
Issue Date: Mar-2024
Date: 2024
Publication information: Journal of Frailty, Sarcopenia and Falls 2024-03; 9(1)
Abstract: The most efficient way to adjust skeletal muscle area (SMA) derived from chest CT to body size remains unclear. We hypothesized that vertebral body area (VBA) measurement would allow such efficient adjustment. We conducted a retrospective observational study of chest CT imaging in a cohort of critically ill COVID-19 patients. We measured paravertebral SMA at T5 level and T5 vertebral body anteroposterior length, width, and area. We used linear regression and multivariable modelling to assess the association of VBA with SMA. In 48 COVID-19 patients in ICU, T5 VBA could be easily derived from simple width and anteroposterior length linear measurements. T5 VBA (measured manually or estimated from width and length) performed similarly to height (R2 of 0.22) as an adjustment variable for SMA, with R2 of 0.23 and 0.22, respectively. Gender had the strongest correlation with SMA (R2 = 0.28). Adding height or age to a model using gender and VBA did not improve correlation. Gender and estimated VBA from simple linear measurements at T5 level on CT images can be utilized for adjustment of SMA without the need for height. Validation of these findings in larger cohorts of critically ill patients is now needed.
URI: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/35162
DOI: 10.22540/JFSF-09-016
ORCID: 
Journal: Journal of Frailty, Sarcopenia and Falls
Start page: 16
End page: 24
PubMed URL: 38444548
ISSN: 2459-4148
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Chest computed tomography
Sarcopenia
Skeletal muscle area
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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