Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/34944
Title: Brainstem processing of cough sensory inputs in chronic cough hypersensitivity.
Austin Authors: Moe, Aung Aung Kywe;Singh, Nabita;Dimmock, Matthew;Cox, Katherine;McGarvey, Lorcan;Chung, Kian Fan;McGovern, Alice E;McMahon, Marcus A ;Richards, Amanda L;Farrell, Michael J;Mazzone, Stuart B
Affiliation: Department of Anatomy and Physiology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia; Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, VIC, Australia.
Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, VIC, Australia.
Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, Swinburne University, Australia.
Wellcome-Wolfson Institute for Experimental Medicine, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, UK.
Experimental Studies Unit, National Heart & Lung Institute, Imperial College London, UK; Department of Respiratory Medicine, Royal Brompton and Harefield Hospital, London, UK.
Department of Anatomy and Physiology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia.
Respiratory and Sleep Medicine
Department of Otolaryngology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, VIC, Australia.
Department of Anatomy and Physiology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia.
Issue Date: 19-Jan-2024
Date: 2024
Publication information: EBioMedicine 2024-01-19; 100
Abstract: Chronic cough is a prevalent and difficult to treat condition often accompanied by cough hypersensitivity, characterised by cough triggered from exposure to low level sensory stimuli. The mechanisms underlying cough hypersensitivity may involve alterations in airway sensory nerve responsivity to tussive stimuli which would be accompanied by alterations in stimulus-induced brainstem activation, measurable with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We investigated brainstem responses during inhalation of capsaicin and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in 29 participants with chronic cough and 29 age- and sex-matched controls. Psychophysical testing was performed to evaluate individual sensitivities to inhaled stimuli and fMRI was used to compare neural activation in participants with cough and control participants while inhaling stimulus concentrations that evoked equivalent levels of urge-to-cough sensation. Participants with chronic cough were significantly more sensitive to inhaled capsaicin and ATP and showed a change in relationship between urge-to-cough perception and cough induction. When urge-to-cough levels were matched, participants with chronic cough displayed significantly less neural activation in medullary regions known to integrate airway sensory inputs. By contrast, neural activations did not differ significantly between the two groups in cortical brain regions known to encode cough sensations whereas activation in a midbrain region of participants with chronic cough was significantly increased compared to controls. Cough hypersensitivity in some patients may occur in brain circuits above the level of the medulla, perhaps involving midbrain regions that amplify ascending sensory signals or change the efficacy of central inhibitory control systems that ordinarily serve to filter sensory inputs. Supported in part by a research grant from Investigator-Initiated Studies Program of Merck Sharp & Dohme Pty Ltd. The opinions expressed in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent those of Merck Sharp & Dohme (Australia) Pty Ltd.
URI: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/34944
DOI: 10.1016/j.ebiom.2024.104976
ORCID: 
Journal: EBioMedicine
Start page: 104976
PubMed URL: 38244293
ISSN: 2352-3964
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: ATP
Brain imaging
Brainstem
Cough
Purinergic
Sensitisation
Vagal sensory
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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