Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/34823
Title: Association between physical activity levels and healing in people with venous leg ulcers: secondary analysis of prospective cohort data.
Austin Authors: Qiu, Yunjing;Osadnik, Christian R;Brusco, Natasha K;Sussman, Geoffrey;Reeves, Judy;Gleghorn, Leanne;Weller, Carolina D;Team, Victoria
Affiliation: School of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, NSW, Australia.;School of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, VIC, Australia.
Department of Physiotherapy, School of Primary and Allied Health Care, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Frankston, VIC, Australia.
Rehabilitation, Ageing and Independent Living Research Centre, School of Primary and Allied Health Care, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Frankston, VIC, Australia.
Austin Health
Alfred Health, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
Cabrini Hospital, Malvern, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, VIC, Australia.
Department of General Practice Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Science Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
Issue Date: 2023
Date: 2023
Publication information: Frontiers in Medicine 2023; 10
Abstract: To explore the relationship between physical activity levels and wound healing and recurrence in people with venous leg ulcers. Questionnaires and medical records were used to collect data, with responses used to group participants into different physical activity groups. The differences in healing and recurrence outcomes of ulcers among different physical activity groups were compared using Chi-square, Kaplan Meier survival analysis, Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, and Kruskal-Wallis test. To measure the strength of the association between physical activity levels and patient outcomes, Spearman's Rho tests were used. We used descriptive analysis to examine how physical activity levels change over 24 weeks. Participants were classified into four distinct groups based on physical activity levels reported at baseline and week 12. The survival analysis showed higher physical activity level was associated with a shorter time to healing (log-rank test = 14.78, df = 3; p = 0.002). The persistently moderate-to-vigorous group had a 7.3-fold increased likelihood of healing compared to the persistently sedentary group. High levels of physical activity were also associated with a better quality of life score at baseline (ρ = 0.41, p < 0.000), week 12 (ρ = 0.36, p < 0.001), and week 24 (ρ = 0.49, p < 0.000). Most participants (48.5%) reported low levels of physical activity, which remained low for the entire study period. An increased level of physical activity was linked to a shorter healing time and enhanced quality of life. Low levels of physical activity appeared common among people with venous leg ulcers.
URI: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/34823
DOI: 10.3389/fmed.2023.1305594
ORCID: 
Journal: Frontiers in Medicine
Start page: 1305594
PubMed URL: 38188330
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: adjuvant treatment
healing
physical activity level
recurrence
varicose ulcer
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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