Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/34665
Title: Rapid Versus Slow Cooling Pasteurization of Donor Breast Milk: Does the Cooling Rate Effect Melatonin Reduction?
Austin Authors: Booker, Lauren A ;Fitzgibbon, Cheree;Spong, Jo;Deacon-Crouch, Melissa;Wilson, Danielle L ;Skinner, Timothy C
Affiliation: School of Psychology and Public Health, La Trobe University, Bendigo, Australia.
School of Psychology and Public Health, La Trobe University, Bendigo, Australia.
Institute for Breathing and Sleep
Department of Rural Health Sciences, La Trobe Rural Health School, La Trobe University, Bendigo, Australia.
School of Psychology and Public Health, La Trobe University, Bendigo, Australia.;Institute for Breathing and Sleep, Austin Health, Melbourne, Australia.;Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia.
School of Psychology and Public Health, La Trobe University, Bendigo, Australia.
Issue Date: Dec-2023
Publication information: Breastfeedingm Medicine : the Official journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine 2023-12; 18(12)
Abstract: Background and Objective: There is a question as to whether melatonin levels in breast milk are impacted by the cooling rate postpasteurization. Past research that has used in the Australian donor bank's breast milk Holder Pasteurization technique has reported varying findings regarding melatonin levels postpasteurization. Where breast milk was cooled slowly, a significant reduction in breast milk melatonin levels was observed. Conversely, where a rapid cooling method was used, there was no significant reduction in melatonin levels. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the cooling process between the different pasteurization techniques impact on melatonin levels in breast milk postpasteurization. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven nighttime breast milk samples were collected, with each sample divided into three; one remained unpasteurized, one was pasteurized and rapidly cooled to 4°C, and the other was pasteurized and cooled slowly to 4°C. Results: Melatonin levels were significantly reduced in both the rapidly cooled and slow cooled breast milk samples when compared to their unpasteurized counterpart (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in melatonin levels between the two cooling methods (p = 0.91). Conclusion: This study showed that both the rapid and cooling pasteurization processes had a similar reduction in melatonin levels in breast milk. However, even after pasteurization melatonin was still present. Therefore, it is recommended that donor banks still take into consideration circadian timing hormones such as melatonin and the time of day breast milk is expressed.
URI: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/34665
DOI: 10.1089/bfm.2023.0244
ORCID: 0000-0002-0533-3715
Journal: Breastfeedingm Medicine : the Official journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine
Start page: 951
End page: 955
PubMed URL: 38100440
ISSN: 1556-8342
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: breast milk
breastfeeding
circadian rhythm
infant
melatonin
pasteurization
sleep
Pasteurization/methods
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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