Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/34585
Title: Self-Reported Stuttering Severity Is Accurate: Informing Methods for Large-Scale Data Collection in Stuttering.
Austin Authors: Horton, Sarah;Jackson, Victoria;Boyce, Jessica;Franken, Marie-Christine;Siemers, Stephanie;John, Miya St;Hearps, Stephen;van Reyk, Olivia;Braden, Ruth;Parker, Richard;Vogel, Adam P;Eising, Else;Amor, David J;Irvine, Janelle;Fisher, Simon E;Martin, Nicholas G;Reilly, Sheena;Bahlo, Melanie;Scheffer, Ingrid E ;Morgan, Angela
Affiliation: Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.;Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Population Health and Immunity Division, The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.;Department of Medical Biology, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Speech and Hearing Centre, Sophia Children's Hospital, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.;Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.;Centre for Neuroscience of Speech, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.;Redenlab Inc. Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Language and Genetics Department, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.;Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.;Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Stuttering Treatment and Research Trust (START), Auckland, New Zealand.
Language and Genetics Department, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.;Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
Population Health and Immunity Division, The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.;Department of Medical Biology, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Epilepsy Research Centre
Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Issue Date: 5-Dec-2023
Date: 2023
Publication information: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research : JSLHR 2023-12-05
Abstract: To our knowledge, there are no data examining the agreement between self-reported and clinician-rated stuttering severity. In the era of big data, self-reported ratings have great potential utility for large-scale data collection, where cost and time preclude in-depth assessment by a clinician. Equally, there is increasing emphasis on the need to recognize an individual's experience of their own condition. Here, we examined the agreement between self-reported stuttering severity compared to clinician ratings during a speech assessment. As a secondary objective, we determined whether self-reported stuttering severity correlated with an individual's subjective impact of stuttering. Speech-language pathologists conducted face-to-face speech assessments with 195 participants (137 males) aged 5-84 years, recruited from a cohort of people with self-reported stuttering. Stuttering severity was rated on a 10-point scale by the participant and by two speech-language pathologists. Participants also completed the Overall Assessment of the Subjective Experience of Stuttering (OASES). Clinician and participant ratings were compared. The association between stuttering severity and the OASES scores was examined. There was a strong positive correlation between speech-language pathologist and participant-reported ratings of stuttering severity. Participant-reported stuttering severity correlated weakly with the four OASES domains and with the OASES overall impact score. Participants were able to accurately rate their stuttering severity during a speech assessment using a simple one-item question. This finding indicates that self-report stuttering severity is a suitable method for large-scale data collection. Findings also support the collection of self-report subjective experience data using questionnaires, such as the OASES, which add vital information about the participants' experience of stuttering that is not captured by overt speech severity ratings alone.
URI: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/34585
DOI: 10.1044/2023_JSLHR-23-00081
ORCID: 0000-0003-0831-9705
0000-0002-5836-0741
0000-0001-5081-7631
0000-0002-3505-2631
0000-0001-7191-8511
0000-0003-1147-7405
Journal: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research : JSLHR
Start page: 1
End page: 10
PubMed URL: 38052068
ISSN: 1558-9102
Type: Journal Article
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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