Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/34386
Title: Precision of weight measurement in critically ill infants: a technical report.
Austin Authors: Gelbart, Ben;Masterson, Kate;Serratore, Alyssa;Zampetti, Michael;Veysey, Andrea;Longstaff, Stacey;Bellomo, Rinaldo ;Butt, Warwick;Duke, Trevor
Affiliation: Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.;Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.;Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.;Department of Critical Care, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
Department of Critical Care, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.;Data Analytics Research and Evaluation (DARE) Centre, University of Melbourne and Austin Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.;Department of Intensive Care, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.;Department of Intensive Care, Austin Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.;Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Research Centre, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.;Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.;Department of Critical Care, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
Intensive Care
Issue Date: 6-Dec-2021
Date: 2023
Publication information: Critical Care and Resuscitation : Journal of the Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine 2021-12-06; 23(4)
Abstract: Objectives: To investigate the precision of weight measurements in critically ill infants in a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Royal Children's Hospital PICU. Participants: Mechanically ventilated infants admitted to the Royal Children's Hospital PICU between September 2020 and February 2021. Main outcome measures: Mean percentage difference and agreement of consecutive weight measurements. Results: Thirty infants were enrolled, of which 17 were receiving post-surgical care for congenital heart disease and four were receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The median age was 13 days (interquartile range [IQR], 3.1-52.4 days). The mean difference in weight was 1.3% (standard deviation [SD], 1.0%), and the test-retest agreement intraclass correlation was 0.99 (95% CI, 0.99-0.99; P < 0.01). The percentage difference between measurements was ≤ 2.5% in 26/30 (87%) children, and the range was < 0.1% to 3.6%. In 26 children not receiving ECMO, the mean difference in weight was 1.1% (SD, 1.0%). There were no complications. Conclusions: Weighing mechanically ventilated, critically ill infants in intensive care can be performed safely, with a mean difference between consecutive weights of 1.3%, making it a potentially useful additional measure of fluid accumulation.
URI: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/34386
DOI: 10.51893/2021.4.TN
ORCID: 
Journal: Critical Care and Resuscitation : Journal of the Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
Start page: 414
End page: 417
PubMed URL: 38046691
Type: Journal Article
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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