Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/34340
Title: Physical activity and brain amyloid beta: A longitudinal analysis of cognitively unimpaired older adults.
Austin Authors: Slee, Michael G;Rainey-Smith, Stephanie R;Villemagne, Victor L ;Doecke, James D;Sohrabi, Hamid R;Taddei, Kevin;Ames, David;Doré, Vincent ;Maruff, Paul;Laws, Simon M;Masters, Colin L ;Rowe, Christopher C ;Martins, Ralph N;Erickson, Kirk I;Brown, Belinda M
Affiliation: Centre for Healthy Ageing, Healthy Futures Institute, Murdoch University, Murdoch, Western Australia, Australia.
Centre for Healthy Ageing, Healthy Futures Institute, Murdoch University, Murdoch, Western Australia, Australia.;School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia.;Australian Alzheimer's Research Foundation, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia.;School of Psychological Science, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, Australia.
Molecular Imaging and Therapy
The Australian e-Health Research Centre, CSIRO, Herston, Queensland, Australia.
Centre for Healthy Ageing, Healthy Futures Institute, Murdoch University, Murdoch, Western Australia, Australia.;School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia.;Australian Alzheimer's Research Foundation, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia.;Department of Biomedical Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia.;Australian Alzheimer's Research Foundation, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia.
The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.;National Ageing Research Institute, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.;Academic Unit for Psychiatry of Old Age, University of Melbourne, Carlton, Victoria, Australia.
The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.;Cogstate Ltd, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Centre for Precision Health, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia.;Collaborative Genomics and Translation Group, School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia.;Curtin Medical School, Curtin University, Bentley, Western Australia, Australia.
The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia.;Australian Alzheimer's Research Foundation, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia.;Department of Biomedical Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.
Centre for Healthy Ageing, Healthy Futures Institute, Murdoch University, Murdoch, Western Australia, Australia.;School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia.;Australian Alzheimer's Research Foundation, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia.
Issue Date: 20-Nov-2023
Date: 2023
Publication information: Alzheimer's & Dementia : the Journal of the Alzheimer's Association 2023-11-20
Abstract: The current study evaluated the relationship between habitual physical activity (PA) levels and brain amyloid beta (Aβ) over 15 years in a cohort of cognitively unimpaired older adults. PA and Aβ measures were collected over multiple timepoints from 731 cognitively unimpaired older adults participating in the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle (AIBL) Study of Aging. Regression modeling examined cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between PA and brain Aβ. Moderation analyses examined apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 carriage impact on the PA-Aβ relationship. PA was not associated with brain Aβ at baseline (β = -0.001, p = 0.72) or over time (β = -0.26, p = 0.24). APOE ε4 status did not moderate the PA-Aβ relationship over time (β = 0.12, p = 0.73). Brain Aβ levels did not predict PA trajectory (β = -54.26, p = 0.59). Our study did not identify a relationship between habitual PA and brain Aβ levels. Physical activity levels did not predict brain amyloid beta (Aβ) levels over time in cognitively unimpaired older adults (≥60 years of age). Apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 carrier status did not moderate the physical activity-brain Aβ relationship over time. Physical activity trajectories were not impacted by brain Aβ levels.
URI: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/34340
DOI: 10.1002/alz.13556
ORCID: 
Journal: Alzheimer's & Dementia : the Journal of the Alzheimer's Association
PubMed URL: 37984813
ISSN: 1552-5279
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Alzheimer's disease
amyloid beta
dementia
exercise
genetics
longitudinal
physical activity
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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