Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/34336
Title: Codesigning implementation strategies to improve evidence-based stroke rehabilitation: A feasibility study.
Austin Authors: Lynch, Elizabeth A;Bulto, Lemma N;West, Maria;Cadilhac, Dominique A;Cooper, Fawn;Harvey, Gillian
Affiliation: College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Caring Futures Institute, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.
College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Caring Futures Institute, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.
Occupational Therapy Department, Central Adelaide Health Service, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.
Stroke and Ageing Research, Department of Medicine, School of Clinical Sciences at Monash Health, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia.
College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Caring Futures Institute, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.
The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health
Issue Date: 21-Nov-2023
Date: 2023
Publication information: Health Expectations : an International Journal of Public Participation in Health Care and Health Policy 2023-11-21
Abstract: People with lived experience are rarely involved in implementation science research. This study was designed to assess the feasibility of codesigning and delivering implementation strategies with people with lived experience of stroke and health professionals to improve evidence-based stroke rehabilitation. We used Experience-Based CoDesign to design and deliver strategies to implement Stroke Clinical Guideline recommendations at one Australian inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit. Workgroups were formed with health professionals and people with 6-12 months experience of living with stroke (survivors and carers). Feasibility of the codesign approach (focusing on acceptability, implementation fidelity, signal of promise) was evaluated using mixed methods, using data from interviews, observations and inpatient self-reported outcomes. Of 18 people with stroke invited, eight (44%) agreed to join the lived experience workgroup. All disciplines with ≥1 full-time staff members on the stroke unit were represented on the health professional workgroup. Median workgroup attendance over 6 months was n = 8 health professionals, n = 4 survivors of stroke and n = 1 carers. Workgroup members agreed to focus on two Guideline recommendations: information provision and amount of therapy. Workgroup members indicated that the codesign approach was enjoyable and facilitated effective partnerships between health professionals and lived experience workgroup members. Both cohorts reported contributing valuable input to all stages of the project, with responsibility shifting between groups at different project stages. The codesigned strategies signalled promise for improving aspects of information provision and creating additional opportunities for therapy. We could not compare patient-reported outcomes before and after the implementation period due to high variability between the preimplementation and postimplementation patient cohorts. It is feasible to codesign implementation strategies in inpatient rehabilitation with people with lived experience of stroke and health professionals. More research is required to determine the effect of the codesigned strategies on patient and service outcomes. People with lived experience of stroke codesigned and evaluated implementation strategies. Author F. C. has lived experience of stroke and being an inpatient at the inpatient rehabilitation service, and has provided input into analysis of the findings and preparation of this manuscript.
URI: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/34336
DOI: 10.1111/hex.13904
ORCID: 0000-0001-8756-1051
Journal: Health Expectations : an International Journal of Public Participation in Health Care and Health Policy
PubMed URL: 37990469
ISSN: 1369-7625
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: codesign
feasibility
implementation
lived experience
rehabilitation
stroke
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

Show full item record

Page view(s)

50
checked on Apr 12, 2024

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in AHRO are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.