Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/34007
Title: Size-Dependent Penetration of Nanoparticles in Tumor Spheroids: A Multidimensional and Quantitative Study of Transcellular and Paracellular Pathways.
Austin Authors: Chen, Wenjing;Wang, Wenqian;Xie, Zhouzun;Centurion, Franco;Sun, Bin;Paterson, David J;Tsao, Simon Chang-Hao;Chu, Dewei;Shen, Yansong;Mao, Guangzhao;Gu, Zi
Affiliation: School of Chemical Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, 2052, Australia.;Australian Centre for NanoMedicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, 2052, Australia.
Australian Centre for NanoMedicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, 2052, Australia.
Surgery
Australian Synchrotron ANSTO, Clayton, VIC, 3168, Australia.
School of Natural Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, 2109, Australia.
School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, 2052, Australia.
Australian Centre for NanoMedicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, 2052, Australia.;UNSW RNA Institute, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, 2052, Australia.
Issue Date: 11-Oct-2023
Date: 2023
Publication information: Small (Weinheim an der Bergstrasse, Germany) 2023-10-11
Abstract: Tumor penetration of nanoparticles is crucial in nanomedicine, but the mechanisms of tumor penetration are poorly understood. This work presents a multidimensional, quantitative approach to investigate the tissue penetration behavior of nanoparticles, with focuses on the particle size effect on penetration pathways, in an MDA-MB-231 tumor spheroid model using a combination of spectrometry, microscopy, and synchrotron beamline techniques. Quasi-spherical gold nanoparticles of different sizes are synthesized and incubated with 2D and 3D MDA-MB-231 cells and spheroids with or without an energy-dependent cell uptake inhibitor. The distribution and penetration pathways of nanoparticles in spheroids are visualized and quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, two-photon microscopy, and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy. The results reveal that 15 nm nanoparticles penetrate spheroids mainly through an energy-independent transcellular pathway, while 60 nm nanoparticles penetrate primarily through an energy-dependent transcellular pathway. Meanwhile, 22 nm nanoparticles penetrate through both transcellular and paracellular pathways and they demonstrate the greatest penetration ability in comparison to other two sizes. The multidimensional analytical methodology developed through this work offers a generalizable approach to quantitatively study the tissue penetration of nanoparticles, and the results provide important insights into the designs of nanoparticles with high accumulation at a target site.
URI: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/34007
DOI: 10.1002/smll.202304693
ORCID: 0000-0001-6428-6026
0000-0002-4071-8071
0000-0002-7961-3293
0000-0002-4407-3135
0000-0003-0409-9012
0000-0002-9654-359X
0000-0003-4581-0560
0000-0001-8472-8805
0000-0001-9308-3922
0000-0002-7153-6596
Journal: Small (Weinheim an der Bergstrasse, Germany)
Start page: e2304693
PubMed URL: 37822153
ISSN: 1613-6829
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: gold nanoparticles
paracellular pathway
tissue penetration
transcellular pathway
tumor spheroid
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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