Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/33332
Title: Differences in Ventilation Management and Outcomes between the Two First Waves of the COVID-19 Pandemic-A Comparison between Two Nationwide Observational Studies in The Netherlands.
Austin Authors: Hol, Liselotte;Schultz, Marcus J;Martin-Loeches, Ignacio;van Meenen, David M P;Serpa Neto, Ary ;Paulus, Frederique;PRoAcT-Covid Investigators, null
Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology, Amsterdam University Medical Centers, Location AMC, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
Department of Intensive Care, Amsterdam University Medical Centers, Location AMC, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands.;Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit (MORU), Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400, Thailand.;Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford OX37BN, UK.
Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Multidisciplinary Intensive Care Research Organization (MICRO), St James's Street, Leinster, D08 NYH1 Dublin, Ireland.;Department of Clinical Medicine, Trinity College, D02 PN40 Dublin, Ireland.
Department of Intensive Care, Amsterdam University Medical Centers, Location AMC, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
Department of Critical Care Medicine, Hospital Israelite Albert Einstein, Sao Paolo 05652-900, Brazil.
Department of Intensive Care, Amsterdam University Medical Centers, Location AMC, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands.;Centre of Applied Research, Faculty of Health, Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, 1091 GC Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
Intensive Care
Issue Date: 5-Jul-2023
Date: 2023
Publication information: Journal of Clinical Medicine 2023-07-05; 12(13)
Abstract: The aim of this analysis was to compare ventilation management and outcomes in invasively ventilated patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) between the first and second wave in the Netherlands. This is a post hoc analysis of two nationwide observational COVID-19 studies conducted in quick succession. The primary endpoint was ventilation management. Secondary endpoints were tracheostomy use, duration of ventilation, intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital length of stay (LOS), and mortality. We used propensity score matching to control for observed confounding factors. This analysis included 1122 patients from the first and 568 patients from the second wave. Patients in the second wave were sicker, had more comorbidities, and had worse oxygenation parameters. They were ventilated with lower positive end-expiratory pressure and higher fraction inspired oxygen, had a lower oxygen saturation, received neuromuscular blockade more often, and were less often tracheostomized. Duration of ventilation was shorter, but mortality rates were similar. After matching, the fraction of inspired oxygen was lower in the second wave. In patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure due to COVID-19, aspects of respiratory care and outcomes rapidly changed over the successive waves.
URI: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/33332
DOI: 10.3390/jcm12134507
ORCID: 0000-0003-3887-1808
0000-0003-3969-7792
0000-0002-5834-4063
Journal: Journal of Clinical Medicine
PubMed URL: 37445542
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: COVID-19
complications
coronavirus disease 2019
invasive ventilation
ventilation management
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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