Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/33286
Title: "Wasting time": a qualitative study of stroke survivors' experiences of boredom in non-therapy time during inpatient rehabilitation.
Austin Authors: Kenah, Katrina;Tavener, Meredith;Bernhardt, Julie;Spratt, Neil J;Janssen, Heidi
Affiliation: School of Health Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.
School of Medicine and Public Health, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.
The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health
NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Stroke Rehabilitation and Brain Recovery, Hunter Medical Research Institute, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.;Dept Neurology, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.;School of Biomedical Science and Pharmacy, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.
School of Health Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.;NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Stroke Rehabilitation and Brain Recovery, Hunter Medical Research Institute, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.;Hunter Stroke Service, Hunter New England Local Health District, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.
Monash Health, Cheltenham, VIC, Australia.
Issue Date: 6-Jul-2023
Date: 2023
Publication information: Disability and Rehabilitation 2023-07-06
Abstract: Stroke survivors regularly report experiencing boredom during inpatient rehabilitation which may detrimentally affect mood, learning and engagement in activities important for functional recovery. This study explores how stroke survivors meaningfully occupy their non-therapy time and their experiences of boredom, to further our understanding of this complex phenomenon. Secondary analysis of transcripts from semi-structured interviews with stroke survivors exploring activity during non-therapy time. Transcripts were coded and analysed using a hybrid approach of inductive and deductive thematic analysis, guided by a published boredom framework. Analysis of 58 interviews of 36 males and 22 females, median age 70 years, revealed four main themes: (i) Resting during non-therapy time is valued, (ii) Managing "wasted" time, (iii) Meaningful environments support autonomy and restore a sense of normality, and (iv) Wired to be social. Whilst limited therapy, social opportunities and having "nothing to do" were common experiences, those individuals who felt in control and responsible for driving their own stroke recovery tended to report less boredom during their rehabilitation stay. Creating rehabilitation environments that support autonomy, socialisation and opportunities to participate in activity are clear targets to reduce boredom during non-therapy time, increase meaningful engagement and possibly improve rehabilitation outcomes post-stroke.
URI: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/33286
DOI: 10.1080/09638288.2023.2230131
ORCID: 0000-0003-2643-1186
Journal: Disability and Rehabilitation
Start page: 1
End page: 9
PubMed URL: 37409578
ISSN: 1464-5165
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Boredom
autonomy
engagement
healthcare environments
rehabilitation
stroke
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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