Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/33134
Title: Targeted interventions and their effect on recovery in children, adolescents and adults who have sustained a sport-related concussion: a systematic review.
Austin Authors: Schneider, Kathryn J;Critchley, Meghan L;Anderson, Vicki;Davis, Gavin A ;Debert, Chantel T;Feddermann-Demont, Nina;Gagnon, Isabelle;Guskiewicz, Kevin M;Hayden, K Alix;Herring, Stanley;Johnstone, Corson;Makdissi, Michael;Master, Christina L;Moser, Rosemarie Scolaro;Patricios, Jon S;Register-Mihalik, Johna K;Ronksley, Paul E;Silverberg, Noah D;Yeates, Keith Owen
Affiliation: Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre, Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Child Neuropsychology, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Department of Neurology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich Switzerland Sports Neuroscience, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Sports Medicine Research Laboratory, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
Libraries and Cultural Resources, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Departments of Rehabilitation Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine and Neurological Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
Australian Football League, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health
Pediatrics and Sports Medicine, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
Sports Concussion Center of New Jersey, Princeton, New Jersey, USA.
Wits Sport and Health (WiSH), School of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
Exercise and Sport Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.;Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.;Psychology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Psychology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
Cabrini Health, Malvern, Victoria, Australia.
Issue Date: Jun-2023
Publication information: British Journal of Sports Medicine 2023
Abstract: We evaluated interventions to facilitate recovery in children, adolescents and adults with a sport-related concussion (SRC). Systematic review including risk of bias (modified Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network tool). MEDLINE(R) and Epub Ahead of Print, In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Embase, APA PsycINFO, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL Plus with Full Text, SPORTDiscus and Scopus searched until March 2022. (1) Original research including randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-experimental designs, cohort, comparative effectiveness studies; (2) focus on SRC; (3) English; (4) peer-reviewed and (5) evaluated treatment. 6533 studies were screened, 154 full texts reviewed and 13 met inclusion (10 RCTs, 1 quasi-experimental and 2 cohort studies; 1 high-quality study, 7 acceptable and 5 at high risk of bias). Interventions, comparisons, timing and outcomes varied, precluding meta-analysis. For adolescents and adults with dizziness, neck pain and/or headaches >10 days following concussion, individualised cervicovestibular rehabilitation may decrease time to return to sport compared with rest followed by gradual exertion (HR 3.91 (95% CI 1.34 to 11.34)) and when compared with a subtherapeutic intervention (HR 2.91 (95% CI 1.01 to 8.43)). For adolescents with vestibular symptoms/impairments, vestibular rehabilitation may decrease time to medical clearance (vestibular rehab group 50.2 days (95% CI 39.9 to 60.4) compared with control 58.4 (95% CI 41.7 to 75.3) days). For adolescents with persisting symptoms >30 days, active rehabilitation and collaborative care may decrease symptoms. Cervicovestibular rehabilitation is recommended for adolescents and adults with dizziness, neck pain and/or headaches for >10 days. Vestibular rehabilitation (for adolescents with dizziness/vestibular impairments >5 days) and active rehabilitation and/or collaborative care (for adolescents with persisting symptoms >30 days) may be of benefit.
URI: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/33134
DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2022-106685
ORCID: 0000-0002-5951-5899
0000-0001-8293-4496
0000-0003-2043-1644
0000-0002-6717-4270
0000-0002-0893-4321
0000-0002-6829-4098
0000-0001-6378-148X
0000-0001-7680-2892
Journal: British Journal of Sports Medicine
Start page: 771
End page: 779
PubMed URL: 37316188
ISSN: 1473-0480
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Brain Concussion
Recovery
Rehabilitation
Sport
Brain Concussion/therapy
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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