Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/33080
Title: Sleep and respiratory abnormalities in adults with developmental and epileptic encephalopathies using polysomnography and video-EEG monitoring.
Austin Authors: Sivathamboo, Shobi;Myers, Kenneth A;Pattichis, Andreas;White, Elise J;Ku, Ka Nyuk;O'Brien, Terence J;Perucca, Piero ;Kwan, Patrick
Affiliation: Department of Neuroscience, Central Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Department of Medicine (The Royal Melbourne Hospital), The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Department of Neurology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
Department of Neurology, Alfred Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Epilepsy Research Centre
Comprehensive Epilepsy Program
Department of Neurology, Alfred Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Alfred Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Pediatrics, Montreal Children's Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Montreal Children's Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Issue Date: Sep-2023
Date: 2023
Publication information: Epilepsia Open 2023-09; 8(3)
Abstract: This study evaluated sleep and respiratory abnormalities, and their relationship with seizures, in adults with developmental and epileptic encephalopathies (DEEs). We studied consecutive adults with DEEs undergoing inpatient video-EEG monitoring and concurrent polysomnography between December 2011 and July 2022. Thirteen patients with DEEs were included (median age: 31 years, range: 20-50; 69.2% female): Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (n = 6), Lennox-Gastaut syndrome-like phenotype (n = 2), Landau-Kleffner syndrome (n = 1), epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures (n = 1), and unclassified DEEs (n = 3). Sleep architecture was often fragmented by epileptiform discharges and seizures resulting in arousals (median arousal index: 29.0 per h, range: 5.1-65.3). Moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) was observed in seven patients (53.8%). Three patients (23.1%) had tonic seizures that frequently occurred with central apnea; one met criteria for mild central sleep apnea. Of the patients with tonic seizures, two had other identifiable seizure manifestations, but in one patient, central apnea was commonly the only discernable seizure manifestation. Polysomnography during video-EEG is an effective diagnostic tool in detecting sleep and seizure-related respiratory abnormalities. Clinically significant OSA may increase the risk of comorbid cardiovascular disease and premature mortality. Treatment of epilepsy may improve sleep quality, and conversely, improved sleep, may decrease seizure burden.
URI: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/33080
DOI: 10.1002/epi4.12772
ORCID: 0000-0003-4638-9579
0000-0001-7831-4593
0000-0002-7198-8621
0000-0002-7855-7066
0000-0001-7310-276X
Journal: Epilepsia Open
PubMed URL: 37277988
ISSN: 2470-9239
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: DEE
epilepsy
sleep-disordered breathing
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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