Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/32801
Title: Hip fracture incidence and post-fracture mortality in Victoria, Australia: a state-wide cohort study.
Austin Authors: Leung, Miriam T Y;Marquina, Clara;Turner, Justin P;Ilomaki, Jenni;Tran, Tim ;Bell, J Simon
Affiliation: Centre for Medicine Use and Safety, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University (Parkville Campus), 381 Royal Parade, Victoria, 3052, Parkville, Melbourne, Australia.
Pharmacy
Centre for Medicine Use and Safety, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University (Parkville Campus), 381 Royal Parade, Victoria, 3052, Parkville, Melbourne, Australia.;Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Issue Date: 29-Apr-2023
Date: 2023
Publication information: Archives of Osteoporosis 2023; 18(1)
Abstract: Hip fractures are a major public health concern. Number of hip fractures cases increased by 20% from 2012 to 2018. Factors associated with post-fracture mortality included men, those who are frail, living in a non-metropolitan region, or residing in a residential aged care facility. Our results are useful for planning healthcare interventions. Hip fractures are a major public health concern in Australia. Data on hip fracture incidence and mortality are needed to plan and evaluate healthcare interventions. The aims of the study were to investigate (1) the time-trend in absolute number and incidence of first hip fractures, and (2) factors associated with mortality following first hip fractures in Victoria, Australia. A state-wide cohort study of all patients aged [Formula: see text] 50 years admitted to a Victorian hospital for first hip fracture between July 2012 and June 2018. Annual age-standardized incidence rates were calculated using population data from Australian Bureau of Statistics. Multivariate negative binomial regression was used to investigate factors associated with post-fracture mortality. Overall, 31,578 patients had a first hip fracture, of whom two-thirds were women and 47% were [Formula: see text] 85 years old. Absolute annual numbers of first hip fractures increased by 20%. There was no significant change in age- and sex-adjusted incidence. In total, 8% died within 30 days and 25% within 1 year. Factors associated with 30-day mortality included age (≥ 85 years old versus 50-64 years old, mortality rate ratio [MRR] 8.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 5.86-11.33), men (MRR 2.11, 95% CI 1.88-2.37), higher Hospital Frailty Risk Scores (high frailty versus no frailty, MRR 3.46, 95% CI 2.66-4.50), admission from a residential aged care facility (RACF) (MRR 2.28, 95% CI 1.85-2.82), and residing in a non-metropolitan region (MRR 1.22, 95% CI 1.09-1.38). The same factors were associated with 1-year mortality. The absolute increase in hip fractures highlights the need for interventions to reduce fracture risk, especially for those at higher risk of post-fracture mortality, including men and those who are frail, living in a non-metropolitan region, or residing in a RACF.
URI: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/32801
DOI: 10.1007/s11657-023-01254-6
ORCID: 
Journal: Archives of Osteoporosis
Start page: 56
PubMed URL: 37119328
ISSN: 1862-3514
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Frailty
Hip fracture
Incidence
Mortality
Risk factors
Victoria/epidemiology
Hip Fractures/etiology
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

Show full item record

Page view(s)

26
checked on Apr 19, 2024

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in AHRO are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.