Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/32133
Title: The Association between Nursing Skill Mix and Patient Outcomes in a Mental Health Setting: An Observational Feasibility Study.
Austin Authors: Moyo, Nompilo;Jones, Martin;Dennis, Shaun;Sharma, Karan;McKeown, Michael ;Gray, Richard
Affiliation: School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC 3086, Australia.
School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC 3086, Australia.
Whyalla Integrated Mental Health Service, Flinders & Upper North Local Health Network, Whyalla, SA 5600, Australia.
Austin Health
Whyalla Integrated Mental Health Service, Flinders & Upper North Local Health Network, Whyalla, SA 5600, Australia.
School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC 3086, Australia.
Mental Health
Issue Date: 3-Feb-2023
Date: 2023
Publication information: International journal of environmental research and public health 2023; 20(3):2715
Abstract: Higher levels of educational preparation for nurses are associated with lower mortality rates in both medical and surgical wards. In mental health inpatient wards, few studies have examined whether specialist mental health nurse training has any impact on patient outcomes. The aim of this retrospective observational study was to establish the feasibility of extracting and linking nurse education and inpatient outcome data from hospital administrative sources to inform the design of future mental health nursing skill mix studies. Study participants were people experiencing mental ill-health and admitted to psychiatric inpatient care for at least 24 h. The exposure was the ratio of mental health nurses to comprehensive nurses for each patient for each day of their admission. The outcome was readmission for psychiatric inpatient care within 12 months of discharge from the index admission. Confounders were patient demographic (age, gender) and clinical characteristics (diagnosis, legal status, community follow-up). Forty-four patients included in the study were inpatients for a total of 595 days. The median hospital stay was 12 days (IQR = 7-17). In total, 11 (25%) patients were readmitted. In the readmitted and not readmitted groups, the median skill mix ratio was 5 (IQR = 5-7) and 5 (1-6), respectively. It was feasible to extract and code patient and nurse data from hospital databases and link them together. However, a substantial amount of manual post hoc recoding was required to enable us to calculate the exposure (mental health to comprehensive nurse ratio) in a precise way. It may be realistic to automate our methodology in an appropriately powered mental health nursing skill mix study. Australian and New Zealand clinical trial registry: ACTRN12619001337167p.
URI: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/32133
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph20032715
ORCID: 0000-0001-7287-8996
0000-0002-6463-3574
0000-0001-9694-4206
Journal: International journal of environmental research and public health
PubMed URL: 36768081
ISSN: 1660-4601
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: inpatient
mental health nurse
nurse skill mix
readmission
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