Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/28802
Title: Understanding self-report and neurocognitive assessments of cognitive flexibility in people with and without lifetime anorexia nervosa.
Austin Authors: Miles, Stephanie;Nedeljkovic, Maja;Sumner, Philip;Phillipou, Andrea 
Affiliation: Mental Health
Department of Mental Health, St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia
Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
Centre for Mental Health, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia
Issue Date: Sep-2022
metadata.dc.date: 2022-02-10
Publication information: Cognitive Neuropsychiatry 2022; 27(5): 325-341
Abstract: Objective: Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious eating disorder associated with several cognitive difficulties including poor cognitive flexibility (i.e. difficulties in effectively adapting to changes in the environment and/or changing task demands). AN research has primarily assessed cognitive flexibility using neurocognitive tests, and little is known about the differences or similarities between self-report and neurocognitive assessments of cognitive flexibility. This study investigated the relationship between self-report and neurocognitive assessments of cognitive flexibility in people with no history of an eating disorder (n = 207) and people with a self-reported lifetime diagnosis of AN (n = 19).Methods: Participants completed self-report and neurocognitive assessments of cognitive flexibility through an online study.Results: No significant correlations were found between self-report and neurocognitive assessments of cognitive flexibility for either group of the sample, suggesting that these assessments may evaluate different aspects of cognitive flexibility. Further, negative mood and self-reported eating disorder symptoms were found to significantly relate to self-reported cognitive flexibility, but were not associated with performance on neurocognitive tests of cognitive flexibility.Conclusions: To provide a comprehensive understanding of perceived and objective cognitive flexibility in AN, future research and clinical assessments should include both self-report and neurocognitive assessments.
URI: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/28802
DOI: 10.1080/13546805.2022.2038554
ORCID: 0000-0001-8190-894X
0000-0003-0963-0335
0000-0003-1009-6619
PubMed URL: 35142252
PubMed URL: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35142252/
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Cognitive assessment
eating disorders
executive function
neurocognitive test
set-shifting
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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