Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/27642
Title: MRI Patterns Distinguish AQP4 Antibody Positive Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder From Multiple Sclerosis.
Austin Authors: Clarke, Laura;Arnett, Simon;Bukhari, Wajih;Khalilidehkordi, Elham;Jimenez Sanchez, Sofia;O'Gorman, Cullen;Sun, Jing;Prain, Kerri M;Woodhall, Mark;Silvestrini, Roger;Bundell, Christine S;Abernethy, David A;Bhuta, Sandeep;Blum, Stefan;Boggild, Mike;Boundy, Karyn;Brew, Bruce J;Brownlee, Wallace;Butzkueven, Helmut;Carroll, William M;Chen, Cella;Coulthard, Alan;Dale, Russell C;Das, Chandi;Fabis-Pedrini, Marzena J;Gillis, David;Hawke, Simon;Heard, Robert;Henderson, Andrew P D;Heshmat, Saman;Hodgkinson, Suzanne;Kilpatrick, Trevor J;King, John;Kneebone, Christopher;Kornberg, Andrew J;Lechner-Scott, Jeannette;Lin, Ming-Wei;Lynch, Christopher;Macdonell, Richard A L ;Mason, Deborah F;McCombe, Pamela A;Pereira, Jennifer;Pollard, John D;Ramanathan, Sudarshini;Reddel, Stephen W;Shaw, Cameron P;Spies, Judith M;Stankovich, James;Sutton, Ian;Vucic, Steve;Walsh, Michael;Wong, Richard C;Yiu, Eppie M;Barnett, Michael H;Kermode, Allan G K;Marriott, Mark P;Parratt, John D E;Slee, Mark;Taylor, Bruce V;Willoughby, Ernest;Brilot, Fabienne;Vincent, Angela;Waters, Patrick;Broadley, Simon A
Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, QLD, Australia
Department of Neurology, St. Vincent's Hospital, Darlinghurst, NSW, Australia
Menzies Research Institute, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia
School of Medicine, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, VIC, Australia
Department of Neurology, Concord Repatriation General Hospital, Concord, NSW, Australia
Department of Neurology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, SA, Australia
Department of Neurology, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, VIC, Australia
Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia
South Western Sydney Medical School, Liverpool Hospital, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, NSW, Australia
Department of Neurology, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW, Australia
Brain and Mind Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia
Sydney Medical School, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia
Department of Neurology, Canberra Hospital, Garran, ACT, Australia
Department of Ophthalmology, Flinders Medical Centre, Flinders University, Bedford Park, SA, Australia
Centre for Neuromuscular and Neurological Disorders, Queen Elizabeth II Medical Centre, Perron Institute for Neurological and Translational Science, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA, Australia
School of Medicine, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, University of Queensland, Herston, QLD, Australia
Department of Neurology, Townsville Hospital, Douglas, QLD, Australia
School of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA, Australia
Department of Immunopathology, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW, Australia
Neuroimmunology Group, Kids Neurosciences Centre, Children's Hospital at Westmead, University of Sydney, Westmead, NSW, Australia
Centre for Clinical Research, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, University of Queensland, Herston, QLD, Australia
Neurology
Hunter Medical Research Institute, University of Newcastle, New Lambton Heights, NSW, Australia
Department of Neurology, Gold Coast University Hospital, Southport, QLD, Australia
Department of Neurology, College of Medicine and Public Health, Flinders University, Bedford Park, SA, Australia
Department of Neurology, Wellington Hospital, Newtown, New Zealand
Centre for Applied Medical Research, St. Vincent's Hospital, University of New South Wales, Darlinghurst, NSW, Australia
Melbourne Brain Centre, Royal Melbourne Hospital, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia
Department of Immunology, Pathology Queensland, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Herston, QLD, Australia
Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Gold Coast, Griffith University, Southport, QLD, Australia
School of Paediatrics, Royal Children's Hospital, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia
School of Medicine, University of Auckland, Grafton, New Zealand
Department of Neurology, Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch, New Zealand
Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, John Radcliffe Hospital, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
Department of Neurology, Auckland City Hospital, Grafton, New Zealand
Issue Date: 9-Sep-2021
Date: 2021-09-09
Publication information: Frontiers in Neurology 2021; 12: 722237
Abstract: Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) and multiple sclerosis (MS) are inflammatory diseases of the CNS. Overlap in the clinical and MRI features of NMOSD and MS means that distinguishing these conditions can be difficult. With the aim of evaluating the diagnostic utility of MRI features in distinguishing NMOSD from MS, we have conducted a cross-sectional analysis of imaging data and developed predictive models to distinguish the two conditions. NMOSD and MS MRI lesions were identified and defined through a literature search. Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibody positive NMOSD cases and age- and sex-matched MS cases were collected. MRI of orbits, brain and spine were reported by at least two blinded reviewers. MRI brain or spine was available for 166/168 (99%) of cases. Longitudinally extensive (OR = 203), "bright spotty" (OR = 93.8), whole (axial; OR = 57.8) or gadolinium (Gd) enhancing (OR = 28.6) spinal cord lesions, bilateral (OR = 31.3) or Gd-enhancing (OR = 15.4) optic nerve lesions, and nucleus tractus solitarius (OR = 19.2), periaqueductal (OR = 16.8) or hypothalamic (OR = 7.2) brain lesions were associated with NMOSD. Ovoid (OR = 0.029), Dawson's fingers (OR = 0.031), pyramidal corpus callosum (OR = 0.058), periventricular (OR = 0.136), temporal lobe (OR = 0.137) and T1 black holes (OR = 0.154) brain lesions were associated with MS. A score-based algorithm and a decision tree determined by machine learning accurately predicted more than 85% of both diagnoses using first available imaging alone. We have confirmed NMOSD and MS specific MRI features and combined these in predictive models that can accurately identify more than 85% of cases as either AQP4 seropositive NMOSD or MS.
URI: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/27642
DOI: 10.3389/fneur.2021.722237
Journal: Frontiers in Neurology
PubMed URL: 34566866
ISSN: 1664-2295
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: NMOSD
diagnosis
magnetic resonance imaging
multiple sclerosis
neuromyelitis optica
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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