Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/27300
Title: A comparison of the hemodynamic effects of fluid bolus therapy with crystalloids vs. 4% albumin and vs. 20% albumin in patients after cardiac surgery.
Austin Authors: Yanase, Fumitaka ;Cutuli, Salvatore L ;Naorungroj, Thummaporn ;Bitker, Laurent;Wilson, Anthony;Eastwood, Glenn M ;Bellomo, Rinaldo 
Affiliation: Centre for Integrated Critical Care, School of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Service de médecine intensive et réanimation, hôpital de la Croix Rousse, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France..
Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Research Centre (ANZIC-RC), School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Australia
Intensive Care
Dipartimento di Scienze dell'emergenza, anestesiologiche e della Rianimazione, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Rome, Italy; Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy..
Department of Intensive Care, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand..
Issue Date: 14-Aug-2021
Date: 2021
Publication information: Heart & Lung : the Journal of Critical Care 2021; 50(6): 870-876
Abstract: Crystalloids, 4% albumin and 20% albumin are used for fluid bolus therapy (FBT) in patients after cardiac surgery. However, their detailed early (30 min) hemodynamic effects remain unstudied. In a comparative prospective observational trial of 120 ventilated, we studied post cardiac surgery patients who received crystalloid 500 ml FBT, 4% albumin 500 ml FBT or 20% albumin 100 ml FBT (40 per group). We recorded second-by-second hemodynamic parameters and 15-minutely cardiac index (CI) data before and for 30 min after FBT. We compared the crystalloid group (reference) vs. the 4% albumin group, and vs. the 20% albumin group. Immediately after FBT, the mean (standard deviation) CI increase was 0.4 (0.4) L/min/m2 with crystalloids, 0.4 (0.5) L/min/m2 with 4% albumin and 0.3 (0.4) L/min/m2 with 20% albumin, despite the much smaller FBT volume with 20% albumin. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) increase was 11 (10), 12 (9) and 9 (6) mm Hg, respectively. There was no group effect or interaction for changes in CI. However, there were time-group interactions for MAP changes such that crystalloid FBT had faster MAP reduction than 4% (p<0.001) or 20% albumin (p < 0.001). Moreover, patients treated with crystalloid FBT showed a faster decline in central venous pressure, perfusion pressure than the two groups. Finally, 20% albumin attenuated the fall in temperature induced by FBT. In postoperative cardiac surgery patients, after a similar initial CI and MAP response, the MAP effect of crystalloid FBT dissipates faster than that of 4% or 20% albumin FBT. These findings can be used to inform clinical practice.
URI: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/27300
DOI: 10.1016/j.hrtlng.2021.07.014
Journal: Heart & Lung : the Journal of Critical Care
PubMed URL: 34403891
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Fluid bolus
albumin
cardiac index
cardiac surgery
crystalloid
hemodynamics
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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