Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/26616
Title: Healthcare access and attitudes towards telehealth during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic among an Australian cohort with inflammatory arthritis.
Austin Authors: Rischin, Adam;Liew, David F L ;Black, Rachel;Fletcher, Ashley;Buchbinder, Rachelle;Lassere, Marissa;March, Lyn;Robinson, Philip C;Hill, Catherine J 
Affiliation: University of Queensland Faculty of Medicine, Department of Rheumatology, Royal Brisbane Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Rheumatology Unit, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
Rheumatology Unit, The Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
Adelaide Medical School, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
Monash Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Cabrini Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Florance and Cope Professorial Department of Rheumatology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Institute of Bone and Joint Research, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
School of Population Health, UNSW Medicine, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Department of Rheumatology, St George Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Department of Rheumatology, The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Rheumatology
Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: May-2021
Publication information: Internal Medicine Journal 2021; 51(5): 788-792
Abstract: Community restrictions due to COVID-19 have changed healthcare, including increased telehealth use. During the early pandemic phase, a cohort of Australian patients with inflammatory arthritis was surveyed. Self-reported access to healthcare was maintained and physical health was more likely to be self-rated poorly than mental health. There was a high level of support for telehealth during and after the pandemic.
URI: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/26616
DOI: 10.1111/imj.15309
ORCID: 0000-0003-2849-7680
0000-0001-8451-8883
0000-0002-0597-0933
0000-0002-3156-3418
0000-0001-8289-4922
PubMed URL: 34047040
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: COVID-19
healthcare access
inflammatory arthritis
mental health
physical health
telehealth
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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