Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/25565
Title: The modified bilobed flap for reconstructing sacral decubitus ulcers.
Austin Authors: Jiao, Xiangong;Cui, Chunxiao;Ng, Sally Kiu-Huen ;Jiang, Zhangjia;Tu, Chihui;Zhou, Jiemin;Lu, Xiandong;Ouyang, Xianwen;Luo, Tong;Li, Ke;Zhang, Yixin
Affiliation: Plastic, Reconstructive and Burn Centre, Liuyang People's Hospital, 49 Renmin Middle Road, Liuyang 410300, Hunan, China
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine, 639 Zhi Zao Ju Road, Shanghai 200011, China
Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
ENT Institute, Eye & ENT Hospital, Fudan University, 83 Fenyang Road, Shanghai 200011, China
Department of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Eye & ENT Hospital, Fudan University, 83 Fenyang Road, Shanghai 200011, China
NHC Key Laboratory of Hearing Medicine, Fudan University, 83 Fenyang Road, Shanghai 200011, China
Issue Date: 12-Dec-2020
Date: 2020-12-12
Publication information: Burns & Trauma 2020; 8: tkaa012
Abstract: Sacral pressure ulcers are associated with high morbidity and, in some cases, result in mortality from severe sepsis. Local flaps are frequently used for reconstruction of stage III and IV pressure ulcers. An ideal flap should be simple to design, have a reliable vascular supply and minimal donor site morbidity. Our study evaluates the use of a bilobed flap based on the superficial branch of the superior gluteal artery or the posterior branch of the fourth lumbar artery to reconstruct the sacral pressure ulcer. We performed a retrospective analysis of paraplegic patients with sacral pressure ulcers treated with our bilobed flaps from January 2015 to December 2019. A description of our management, operative protocol, outcome and complications is outlined. Seven paraplegic patients (6 male, 1 female; average age 53.1 years) with sacral pressure ulcers were treated with our bilobed flap based on the superficial branch of the superior gluteal artery or the posterior branch of the fourth lumbar artery. The average size of the pressure ulcers was 7 × 5 cm (range 6.2 × 4.5 cm to 11 × 10 cm). All 7 flaps survived. The patients were followed up for 12 months without significant complications, such as flap necrosis or recurrence. The superficial branch of the superior gluteal artery or the posterior branch of the fourth lumbar artery reliably supplies the bilobed flap. The superior cluneal nerve can be included in the design. The technique is simple and reliable. It should be included in the reconstructive algorithm for the management of sacral pressure ulcers.
URI: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/25565
DOI: 10.1093/burnst/tkaa012
Journal: Burns & Trauma
PubMed URL: 33335930
ISSN: 2321-3868
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Bilobed flap
Fourth lumbar artery
Pressure sore
Sacrococcygeal
Superior cluneal nerve
Superior gluteal artery
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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