Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/23472
Title: Care-seeking as a proxy indicator of the mental health of elderly Brazilians.
Authors: Castro-de-Araujo, Luis F;Machado, Daiane B;Barreto, Maurício L
Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Austin Health, The University of Melbourne, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Centro de Integração de Dados e Conhecimentos para Saúde (CIDACS), Salvador, BA, Brazil
Issue Date: 1-Jun-2020
EDate: 2020-06-01
Citation: Revista brasileira de psiquiatria (Sao Paulo, Brazil : 1999) 2020; online first: 1 June
Abstract: To assess a large set of metadata made public by the Brazilian Ministry of Health on older subjects who visited outpatient mental health services in Brazil from 2008 to 2012. We extracted data from the Brazilian Unified Health System Information Technology Department (Departamento de Informática do Sistema Único de Saúde, DATASUS), then calculated rates of visits per population in each of the five regions of Brazil, using census data for each year. Finally, logistic regressions were performed with depressive disorders or dementias as dependent variables, controlled by age and year of visit, stratified by region. Mood disorders were the leading reason for visits to outpatient mental health services by older adults, followed by delusional disorders. The calculated rates were lower than the known prevalence of depressive disorders and dementias, but the regressions revealed typical patterns. Males were less likely to present with a depressive disorder, while older subjects were more likely to present with depression and dementia. Publicly available data from DATASUS may not enable inferences about the prevalence of mental disorders in elders, but inferential analyses match what is known about these conditions. This approach is supplemental to other more common ones and is of special importance for policymakers and health system managers.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/23472
DOI: 10.1590/1516-4446-2019-0721
PubMed URL: 32491042
Type: Journal Article
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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