Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/22332
Title: Mining the Methylome Reveals Extensive Diversity in Staphylococcus epidermidis Restriction Modification.
Authors: Lee, Jean Y H;Carter, Glen P;Pidot, Sacha J;Guérillot, Romain;Seemann, Torsten;Gonçalves da Silva, Anders;Foster, Timothy J;Howden, Benjamin P;Stinear, Timothy P;Monk, Ian R
Affiliation: Department of Infectious Diseases, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Melbourne at The Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Victoria, Australia
Doherty Applied Microbial Genomics, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Melbourne at The Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Victoria, Australia
Microbiological Diagnostic Unit Public Health Laboratory, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Melbourne at The Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Victoria, Australia
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Melbourne at The Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Victoria, Australia
Moyne Institute of Preventative Medicine, Department of Microbiology, School of Genetics and Microbiology, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland..
Issue Date: 2019
EDate: 2019
Citation: mBio 2019; 10(6)
Abstract: Staphylococcus epidermidis is a significant opportunistic pathogen of humans. Molecular studies in this species have been hampered by the presence of restriction-modification (RM) systems that limit introduction of foreign DNA. Here, we establish the complete genomes and methylomes for seven clinically significant, genetically diverse S. epidermidis isolates and perform the first systematic genomic analyses of the type I RM systems within both S. epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus Our analyses revealed marked differences in the gene arrangement, chromosomal location, and movement of type I RM systems between the two species. Unlike S. aureus, S. epidermidis type I RM systems demonstrate extensive diversity even within a single genetic lineage. This is contrary to current assumptions and has important implications for approaching the genetic manipulation of S. epidermidis Using Escherichia coli plasmid artificial modification (PAM) to express S. epidermidishsdMS, we readily overcame restriction barriers in S. epidermidis and achieved electroporation efficiencies equivalent to those of modification-deficient mutants. With these functional experiments, we demonstrated how genomic data can be used to predict both the functionality of type I RM systems and the potential for a strain to be electroporation proficient. We outline an efficient approach for the genetic manipulation of S. epidermidis strains from diverse genetic backgrounds, including those that have hitherto been intractable. Additionally, we identified S. epidermidis BPH0736, a naturally restriction-defective, clinically significant, multidrug-resistant ST2 isolate, as an ideal candidate for molecular studies.IMPORTANCEStaphylococcus epidermidis is a major cause of hospital-acquired infections, especially those related to implanted medical devices. Understanding how S. epidermidis causes disease and devising ways to combat these infections have been hindered by an inability to genetically manipulate clinically significant hospital-adapted strains. Here, we provide the first comprehensive analyses of the barriers to the uptake of foreign DNA in S. epidermidis and demonstrate that these are distinct from those described for S. aureus Using these insights, we demonstrate an efficient approach for the genetic manipulation of S. epidermidis to enable the study of clinical isolates for the first time.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/22332
DOI: 10.1128/mBio.02451-19
ORCID: 0000-0001-5751-8503
0000-0003-0237-1473
0000-0003-0150-123X
0000-0001-6982-8074
PubMed URL: 31848274
Type: Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Subjects: DNA methylation
Staphylococcus aureus
coagulase-negative staphylococci
generalized transduction
genetic manipulation
genome analysis
type I restriction modification
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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