Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/22293
Title: Predictors of ManuScript Rejection sYndrome (MiSeRY): a cohort study.
Austin Authors: Han, Hui-Chen ;Koshy, Anoop N ;Lin, Tina;Yudi, Matias B ;Clark, David J ;Teh, Andrew W ;Farouque, Omar 
Affiliation: Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Eastern Health, Melbourne, VIC
Issue Date: Dec-2019
Publication information: Medical Journal of Australia 2019; 211(11): 511-513
Abstract: To assess whether specific factors predict the development of ManuScript Rejection sYndrome (MiSeRY) in academic physicians. Prospective pilot study; participants self-administered a questionnaire about full manuscript submissions (as first or senior author) rejected at least once during the past 5 years. Single centre (tertiary institution). Eight academic physician-authors. Duration of grief. MiSeRY was pre-specified as prolonged grief (grief duration longer than the population median). Eight participants provided data on 32 manuscripts with a total of 93 rejections (median, two rejections per manuscript; interquartile range [IQR], 1-3 rejections per manuscript). Median age at rejection was 37 years (IQR, 33-45 years); 86% of 80 rejections involved male authors (86%), 56 of the authors providing data about these rejections were first authors (60%). The median journal impact factor was 5.9 (IQR, 5.2-17). In 48 cases of rejection (52%), pre-submission expectations of success had been high, and in 54 cases (58%) the manuscripts had been sent for external review. Median grief duration was 3 hours (IQR, 1-24 h). Multivariate analysis indicated that higher pre-submission expectation (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 5.0; 95% CI, 1.5-18), first author status (aOR, 9.5; 95% CI, 1.1-77), and external review (aOR, 19.0; 95% CI 2.9-126) were independent predictors of MiSeRY. To help put authors out of their MiSeRY, journal editors could be more selective in the manuscripts they send for external review. Tempering pre-submission expectations and mastering the Coping and reLaxing Mechanisms (CaLM) of senior colleagues are important considerations for junior researchers.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/22293
DOI: 10.5694/mja2.50414
ORCID: 0000-0002-8741-8631
0000-0002-3706-4150
PubMed URL: 31813172
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Publishing
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

Show full item record

Page view(s)

16
checked on Dec 1, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in AHRO are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.