Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/20636
Title: Body parts of clinical concern in anorexia nervosa versus body dysmorphic disorder: a cross-diagnostic comparison.
Austin Authors: Toh, Wei Lin;Grace, Sally A;Rossell, Susan L;Castle, David J;Phillipou, Andrea 
Affiliation: Department of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Cognitive Neuropsychiatry Team, Alfred Hospital and Monash University Central Clinical School, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Centre for Mental Health, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, VIC, Australia
Department of Optometry and Vision Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Department of Mental Health, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Department of Psychiatry, St. Vincent's Mental Health, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Cognitive Neuropsychiatry Team, Alfred Hospital and Monash University Central Clinical School, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Issue Date: Apr-2020
metadata.dc.date: 2019-04-01
Publication information: Australasian Psychiatry 2020; 28(2): 134-139
Abstract: Anorexia nervosa and body dysmorphic disorder share a hallmark clinical feature of severe body image disturbance. This study aimed to document major demographic and clinical characteristics in anorexia nervosa versus body dysmorphic disorder, and it was the first to compare specific body parts related to body image dissatisfaction across these disorders directly. Anorexia nervosa ( n=26) and body dysmorphic disorder ( n=24) patients were administered a range of clinical measures, including key questions about the specificities of their body image concerns. Results revealed increased psychiatric and personality co-morbidities in anorexia nervosa relative to body dysmorphic disorder. The anorexia nervosa group was mostly preoccupied with three body zones typically linked to weight concerns, whereas the body dysmorphic disorder group fixated on facial features, hair and skin. These findings may help inform differential diagnosis in complex cases and aid in the formulation of targeted interventions.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/20636
DOI: 10.1177/1039856219839477
ORCID: 0000-0002-4187-1182
0000-0003-1009-6619
PubMed URL: 30931578
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: anorexia nervosa
body dysmorphic disorder
body image
classification
co-morbidity
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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