Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/20340
Title: Exploring the effect of antenatal depression treatment on children's epigenetic profiles: findings from a pilot randomized controlled trial.
Austin Authors: Bleker, Laura S;Milgrom, Jeannette ;Sexton-Oates, Alexandra;Roseboom, Tessa J;Gemmill, Alan W ;Holt, Christopher J;Saffery, Richard;Burger, Huibert;de Rooij, Susanne R
Affiliation: Department of General Practice, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, 9713 GZ, Groningen, The Netherlands
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Amsterdam UMC, location AMC, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam, 1105 AZ, The Netherlands
Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, 3010, Australia
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Amsterdam UMC, location AMC, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam, 1105 AZ, The Netherlands
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Amsterdam UMC, location AMC, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam, 1105 AZ, The Netherlands.
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Amsterdam UMC, location AMC, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam, 1105 AZ, The Netherlands.
Murdoch Children's Research Institute-Cancer and Disease Epigenetics, Royal Children's Hospital, Flemington Road, Parkville, Melbourne, VIC, 3052, Australia
Parent-Infant Research Institute (PIRI), Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Amsterdam UMC, location AMC, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam, 1105 AZ, The Netherlands
Issue Date: 4-Feb-2019
metadata.dc.date: 2019-02-04
Publication information: Clinical epigenetics 2019; 11(1): 18
Abstract: Children prenatally exposed to maternal depression more often show behavioral and emotional problems compared to unexposed children, possibly through epigenetic alterations. Current evidence is largely based on animal and observational human studies. Therefore, evidence from experimental human studies is needed. In this follow-up of a small randomized controlled trial (RCT), DNA-methylation was compared between children of women who had received cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for antenatal depression and children of women who had received treatment as usual (TAU). Originally, 54 women were allocated to CBT or TAU. A beneficial treatment effect was found on women's mood symptoms. We describe DNA methylation findings in buccal swab DNA of the 3-7-year-old children (CBT(N) = 12, TAU(N) = 11), at a genome-wide level at 770,668 CpG sites and at 729 CpG sites spanning 16 a priori selected candidate genes, including the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1). We additionally explored associations with women's baseline depression and anxiety symptoms and offspring DNA methylation, regardless of treatment. Children from the CBT group had overall lower DNA methylation compared to children from the TAU group (mean ∆β = - 0.028, 95% CI - 0.035 to - 0.022). Although 68% of the promoter-associated NR3C1 probes were less methylated in the CBT group, with cg26464411 as top most differentially methylated CpG site (p = 0.038), mean DNA methylation of all NR3C1 promoter-associated probes did not differ significantly between the CBT and TAU groups (mean ∆β = 0.002, 95%CI - 0.010 to 0.011). None of the effects survived correction for multiple testing. There were no differences in mean DNA methylation between the children born to women with more severe depression or anxiety compared to children born to women with mild symptoms of depression or anxiety at baseline (mean ∆β (depression) = 0.0008, 95% CI - 0.007 to 0.008; mean ∆β (anxiety) = 0.0002, 95% CI - 0.004 to 0.005). We found preliminary evidence of a possible effect of CBT during pregnancy on widespread methylation in children's genomes and a trend toward lower methylation of a CpG site previously shown by others to be linked to depression and child maltreatment. However, none of the effects survived correction for multiple testing and larger studies are warranted. Trial registration of the original RCT: ACTRN12607000397415 . Registered on 2 August 2007.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/20340
DOI: 10.1186/s13148-019-0616-2
ORCID: 0000-0003-2949-9784
0000-0002-4082-4595
PubMed URL: 30717815
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Antenatal depression
CBT
DNA methylation
Epigenetics
Neurodevelopment
Programming
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

Show full item record

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in AHRO are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.