Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/19908
Title: Post-Hospitalization Short-Term Oxygen Therapy: Use of a Clinical Management Pathway and Long-Term Follow-Up.
Austin Authors: Khor, Yet H ;Wong, Raymond ;McDonald, Christine F 
Affiliation: Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Institute for Breathing and Sleep, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: Mar-2019
metadata.dc.date: 2018-11-06
Publication information: Respiratory care 2019; 64(3): 272-278
Abstract: Home oxygen therapy is commonly prescribed for patients who remain hypoxemic at hospital discharge, although evidence supporting this practice is lacking. This study aimed to evaluate oxygen prescription and follow-up for patients who were prescribed post-discharge short-term oxygen therapy (STOT) and to assess their long-term outcome. A retrospective audit was undertaken of subjects prescribed STOT following hospitalization at a single site in Melbourne, Australia, between January 2011 and December 2015. During the study period, a designated clinical pathway for STOT prescription and follow-up after hospital discharge was in place. Chart review was performed to collect subject demographics and comorbidities, results of oxygen assessment (arterial blood gas and 6-min walk tests) and prescription, and results at follow-up re-assessment and mortality. Over five 5 years, 205 subjects were prescribed STOT upon hospital discharge. Common indications for oxygen treatment were chronic lung disease (54%) and dyspnea palliation (26%). Of the 152 subjects who were discharged with non-palliative oxygen therapy, 28% did not fulfil the recommended prescribing criteria or did not have recommended assessments. Among the 118 subjects who attended for re-assessment 4 weeks after initial oxygen provision, 47 (40%) did not fulfill criteria for long-term oxygen therapy. The 1-y cumulative survival rate for the study population was 56%. A significant proportion of subjects who were prescribed post-discharge STOT did not fulfill the recommended prescribing criteria. The long-term prognosis for subjects who were prescribed post-discharge STOT was poor.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/19908
DOI: 10.4187/respcare.06303
ORCID: 0000-0001-6481-3391
0000-0002-5434-9342
PubMed URL: 30401753
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: COPD
long-term oxygen therapy
oxygen
palliative care
post-discharge
prognosis
short-term oxygen therapy
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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