Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/19223
Title: Outcomes of exertional rhabdomyolysis following high-intensity resistance training.
Austin Authors: Huynh, A;Leong, K;Jones, N ;Crump, Nicholas H ;Russell, D;Anderson, M;Steinfort, D;Johnson, Douglas F
Affiliation: Shinbone Medical Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of General Medicine, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of General Medicine, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Department of Neurology, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: May-2016
Publication information: Internal Medicine Journal 2016; 46(5): 602-8
Abstract: High-intensity resistance training (HIRT) programmes are increasingly popular amongst personal trainers and those attending gymnasiums. We report the experience of exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER) at two tertiary hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. To compare the clinical outcomes of ER with other causes of rhabdomyolysis. Retrospective cross-sectional study of patients presenting with a serum creatine kinase (CK) of greater than 25 000 units/L from 1 September 2013 to 31 August 2014 at two tertiary referral hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. Records were examined to identify care measures implemented during hospital stay, clinical outcomes during admission and on subsequent follow up. Thirty four cases of rhabdomyolysis with a CK of greater than 25 000 units/L (normal range: 20-180 units/L) were identified during the 12-month study period. Twelve of the 34 cases (35%) had ER with 10 of 12 related to HIRT. No acute kidney injury, intensive care admission or death were seen among those with ER. All cases were managed conservatively, with 11 admitted and 9 receiving intravenous fluids only. In contrast, patients with rhabdomyolysis from other causes experienced significantly higher rates of intensive care admission (64%, P = 0.0002), acute kidney injury (82%, P = 0.0001) and death (27%, P = 0.069). ER resulting from HIRT appears to have a benign course compared with rhabdomyolysis of other aetiologies in patients with a serum CK greater than 25 000 units/L. Conservative management of ER appears to be adequate, although this requires confirmation in future prospective studies.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/19223
DOI: 10.1111/imj.13055
PubMed URL: 26949203
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: acute kidney injury
creatine kinase
eccentric contractions
exertional rhabdomyolysis
high-intensity resistance training
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

Show full item record

Page view(s)

4
checked on Jun 23, 2021

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in AHRO are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.