Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/19059
Title: Duration of platelet storage and outcomes of critically ill patients.
Austin Authors: Flint, Andrew;Aubron, Cécile;Bailey, Michael;Bellomo, Rinaldo ;Pilcher, David;Cheng, Allen C;Hegarty, Colin;Reade, Michael C;McQuilten, Zoe
Affiliation: The Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Research Centre
The Intensive Care Unit, The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Australia
Joint Health Command, Australian Defence Force, Canberra, Australia
The Transfusion Research Unit, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
Burns Trauma and Critical Care Research Centre, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
Royal Australian Navy, Australian Defence Force, Canberra, Australia
The Medical Intensive Care Unit, Centre Hospitalier et Universitaire de Brest site La Cavale Blanche-Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest, France
Intensive Care Unit, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Transfusion Service, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
The Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Research Centre
The Infectious Disease Department, The Alfred Hospital
Issue Date: Mar-2017
Publication information: Transfusion 2017; 57(3): 599-605
Abstract: The storage duration of platelet (PLT) units is limited to 5 to 7 days. This study investigates whether PLT storage duration is associated with patient outcomes in critically ill patients. This study was a retrospective analysis of critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) of two hospitals in Australia who received one or more PLT transfusions from 2008 to 2014. Storage duration was approached in several different ways. Outcome variables were hospital mortality and ICU-acquired infection. Associations between PLT storage duration and outcomes were evaluated using multiple logistic regression and also by Cox regression. Among 2250 patients who received one or more PLT transfusions while in the ICU, the storage duration of PLTs was available for 64% of patients (1430). In-hospital mortality was 22.1% and ICU infection rate 7.2%. When comparing patients who received PLTs of a maximum storage duration of not more than 3, 4, or 5 days, there were no significant differences in baseline characteristics. After confounders were adjusted for, the storage duration of PLTs was not independently associated with mortality (4 days vs. ≤3 days, odds ratio [OR] 0.88, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.59-1.30; 5 days vs. ≤3 days, OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.68-1.37) or infection (4 days vs. ≤3 days, OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.39-1.29; 5 days vs. ≤3 days, OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.67-1.83). Similar results were obtained regardless of how storage duration of PLTs was approached. In this large observational study in a heterogeneous ICU population, storage duration of PLTs was not associated with an increased risk of mortality or infection.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/19059
DOI: 10.1111/trf.14056
ORCID: 0000-0003-1570-0707
0000-0002-1650-8939
PubMed URL: 28297080
Type: Journal Article
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

Show full item record

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in AHRO are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.