Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/18480
Title: Amyloid β-associated cognitive decline in the absence of clinical disease progression and systemic illness.
Austin Authors: Harrington, Karra D;Lim, Yen Ying;Ames, David;Hassenstab, Jason;Laws, Simon M;Martins, Ralph N;Rainey-Smith, Stephanie R;Robertson, Joanne;Rowe, Christopher C ;Salvado, Olivier;Doré, Vincent ;Villemagne, Victor L ;Snyder, Peter J;Masters, Colin L ;Maruff, Paul
Affiliation: School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Western Australia, Australia, Australia
Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, USA
The Florey Institute, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Academic Unit for Psychiatry of Old Age, Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Cooperative Research Centre for Mental Health, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Centre of Excellence for Alzheimer's Disease Research and Care, School of Exercise, Biomedical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Department of Medicine, Austin Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
National Ageing Research Institute, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
CogState Ltd., Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
CSIRO Health and Biosecurity, The Australian eHealth Research Centre, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Sir James McCusker Alzheimer's Disease Research Unit, Hollywood Private Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia, Australia
Department of Neurology, Rhode Island Hospital, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA
Charles F. and Joanne Knight Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA
Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA
Department of Neurology, Warren Alpert School of Medicine, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA
Department of Molecular Imaging, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia, Australia
Issue Date: 2017
metadata.dc.date: 2017
Publication information: Alzheimer's & dementia (Amsterdam, Netherlands) 2017; 8: 156-164
Abstract: INTRODUCTION: High levels of amyloid β (Aβ) are associated with cognitive decline in cognitively normal (CN) older adults. This study investigated the nature of cognitive decline in healthy individuals who did not progress to mild cognitive impairment or dementia. METHOD: Cognition was measured over 72 months and compared between low (Aβ-) and high (Aβ+) CN older adults (n = 335) who did not progress to mild cognitive impairment or dementia and who remained free of severe or uncontrolled systemic illness. RESULTS: Compared to the Aβ- group, the Aβ+ group showed no cognitive impairment at baseline but showed substantial decline in verbal learning, episodic memory, and attention over 72 months. DISCUSSION: Moderate cognitive decline, particularly for learning and memory, was associated with Aβ+ in CN older adults in the absence of clinical disease progression and uncontrolled or serious comorbid illness.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/18480
DOI: 10.1016/j.dadm.2017.05.006
ORCID: 0000-0003-3910-2453
PubMed URL: 28761926
ISSN: 2352-8729
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Alzheimer disease
Amyloid
Cognitive aging
Memory
Normal aging
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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