Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/18180
Title: Dr Google in the ED: searching for online health information by adult emergency department patients.
Austin Authors: Cocco, Anthony M;Zordan, Rachel;Taylor, David McD ;Weiland, Tracey J;Dilley, Stuart J;Kant, Joyce;Dombagolla, Mahesha;Hendarto, Andreas;Lai, Fiona;Hutton, Jennie
Affiliation: St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: 15-Oct-2018
metadata.dc.date: 2018-08-20
Publication information: Medical Journal of Australia 2018; 209(8): 342-347
Abstract: To determine the prevalence, predictors, and characteristics of health-related internet searches by adult emergency department (ED) patients; to examine the effect of searching on the doctor-patient relationship and treatment compliance. A multi-centre, observational, cross-sectional study; a purpose-designed 51-item survey, including tools for assessing e-health literacy (eHEALS) and the effects of internet searching on the doctor-patient relationship (ISMII). Setting, participants: 400 adult patients presenting to two large tertiary referral centre emergency departments in Melbourne, February-May 2017. Descriptive statistics for searching prevalence and characteristics, doctor-patient interaction, and treatment compliance; predictors of searching; effect of searching on doctor-patient interaction. 400 of 1056 patients screened for eligibility were enrolled; their mean age was 47.1 years (SD, 21.1 years); 51.8% were men. 196 (49.0%) regularly searched the internet for health information; 139 (34.8%) had searched regarding their current problem before presenting to the ED. The mean ISMII score was 30.3 (95% CI, 29.6-31.0); searching improved the doctor-patient interaction for 150 respondents (77.3%). Younger age (per 10-year higher age band: odds ratio [OR], 0.74; 95% CI, 0.61-0.91) and greater e-health literacy (per one-point eHEALS increase: OR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.06-1.17) predicted searching the current problem prior to presentation; e-health literacy predicted ISMII score (estimate, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.20-0.39). Most patients would never or rarely doubt their diagnosis (79%) or change their treatment plan (91%) because of conflicting online information. Online health care information was frequently sought before presenting to an ED, especially by younger and e-health literate patients. Searching had a positive impact on the doctor-patient interaction and was unlikely to reduce adherence to treatment.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/18180
DOI: 10.5694/mja17.00889
ORCID: 0000-0002-8986-9997
PubMed URL: 30107763
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Consumer health information
EHealth
Internet
Physician-patient relations
Technology
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

Show full item record

Page view(s)

22
checked on Nov 29, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in AHRO are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.