Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/16671
Title: Incidence and prevalence of NMOSD in Australia and New Zealand
Austin Authors: Bukhari, Wajih;Prain, Kerri M;Waters, Patrick;Woodhall, Mark;O'Gorman, Cullen M;Clarke, Laura;Silvestrini, Roger A;Bundell, Christine S;Abernethy, David;Bhuta, Sandeep;Blum, Stefan;Boggild, Mike;Boundy, Karyn;Brew, Bruce J;Brown, Matthew;Brownlee, Wallace J;Butzkueven, Helmut;Carroll, William M;Chen, Celia;Coulthard, Alan;Dale, Russell C;Das, Chandi;Dear, Keith;Fabis-Pedrini, Marzena J;Fulcher, David;Gillis, David;Hawke, Simon;Heard, Robert;Henderson, Andrew PD;Heshmat, Saman;Hodgkinson, Suzanne;Jimenez-Sanchez, Sofia;Killpatrick, Trevor;King, John;Kneebone, Christopher;Kornberg, Andrew J;Lechner-Scott, Jeannette;Lin, Ming-Wei;Lynch, Christpher;Macdonell, Richard;Mason, Deborah F;McCombe, Pamela A;Pender, Michael P;Pereira, Jennifer A;Pollard, John D;Reddel, Stephen W;Shaw, Cameron;Spies, Judith;Stankovich, James;Sutton, Ian;Vucic, Steve;Walsh, Michael;Wong, Richard C;Yiu, Eppie M;Barnett, Michael H;Kermode, Allan G;Marriott, Mark P;Parratt, John D E;Slee, Mark;Taylor, Bruce V;Willoughby, Ernest;Wilson, Robert J;Vincent, Angela;Broadley, Simon A
Affiliation: School of Medicine, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
Department of Immunology, Pathology Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK
Department of Immunopathology, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
School of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, Australia
Department of Neurology, Wellington Hospital, Wellington, New Zealand
Department of Neurology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Queensland, Australia
Department of Neurology, Townsville Hospital, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
Department of Neurology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
Department of Neurology, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Department of Neuroinflammation, Queen Square Multiple Sclerosis Centre, London, UK
Melbourne Brain Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Centre for Neuromuscular and Neurological Disorders, Queen Elizabeth II Medical Centre, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia
Department of Ophthalmology, Flinders Medical Centre and Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Department of Medical Imaging, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Childrens Hospital at Westmead Clinical School, University of Sydney, Westmead, New South Wales, Australia
Department of Neurology, Canberra Hospital, Canberra, ACT, Australia
Global Health Research Centre, Duke Kunshan University, Kunshan, Jiangsu, China
Western Australian Neuroscience Research Institute, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia
Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Westmead Clinical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Department of Neurology, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, New South Wales, Australia
South Western Sydney Medical School, Liverpool Hospital, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, NSW, Australia
Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
School of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Hunter Medical Research Institute, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia
School of Medicine, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
Department of Neurology, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Department of Neurology, Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch, New Zealand
Centre for Clinical Research, University of Queensland, Herston, Queensland, Australia
Brain and Mind Centre, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia
Department of Neurology, Geelong Hospital, Geelong, Victoria, Australia
Menzies Research Institute, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
Children's Neuroscience Centre, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Department of Neurology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Department of Neurology, Flinders Medical Centre, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
Department of Neurology, Auckland Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand
Department of Neurology, Gold Coast University Hospital, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
Issue Date: Aug-2017
metadata.dc.date: 2017-05-26
Publication information: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry 2017; 88(8): 632-638
Abstract: OBJECTIVES: We have undertaken a clinic-based survey of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSDs) in Australia and New Zealand to establish incidence and prevalence across the region and in populations of differing ancestry. BACKGROUND: NMOSD is a recently defined demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). The incidence and prevalence of NMOSD in Australia and New Zealand has not been established. METHODS: Centres managing patients with demyelinating disease of the CNS across Australia and New Zealand reported patients with clinical and laboratory features that were suspicious for NMOSD. Testing for aquaporin 4 antibodies was undertaken in all suspected cases. From this group, cases were identified who fulfilled the 2015 Wingerchuk diagnostic criteria for NMOSD. A capture-recapture methodology was used to estimate incidence and prevalence, based on additional laboratory identified cases. RESULTS: NMOSD was confirmed in 81/170 (48%) cases referred. Capture-recapture analysis gave an adjusted incidence estimate of 0.37 (95% CI 0.35 to 0.39) per million per year and a prevalence estimate for NMOSD of 0.70 (95% CI 0.61 to 0.78) per 100 000. NMOSD was three times more common in the Asian population (1.57 (95% CI 1.15 to 1.98) per 100 000) compared with the remainder of the population (0.57 (95% CI 0.50 to 0.65) per 100 000). The latitudinal gradient evident in multiple sclerosis was not seen in NMOSD. CONCLUSIONS: NMOSD incidence and prevalence in Australia and New Zealand are comparable with figures from other populations of largely European ancestry. We found NMOSD to be more common in the population with Asian ancestry.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/16671
DOI: 10.1136/jnnp-2016-314839
PubMed URL: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28550069
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Ancestry
Epidemiology
Incidence
Neuroimmunology
Prevalence
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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