Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/16580
Title: Exercise training alone or with the addition of activity counseling improves physical activity levels in COPD: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
Austin Authors: Lahham, Aroub;McDonald, Christine F ;Holland, Anne E 
Affiliation: Discipline of Physiotherapy, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia
Institute for Breathing and Sleep, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Department of Medicine, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Physiotherapy, Alfred Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: 8-Dec-2016
Publication information: International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease 2016; 11(1): 3121-3136
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Physical inactivity is associated with poor outcomes in COPD, and as a result, interventions to improve physical activity (PA) are a current research focus. However, many trials have been small and inconclusive. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to study the effects of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) targeting PA in COPD. METHODS: Databases (Physiotherapy Evidence Database [PEDro], Embase, MEDLINE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Central Register for Controlled Trials) were searched using the following keywords: "COPD", "intervention" and "physical activity" from inception to May 20, 2016; published RCTs that aimed to increase PA in individuals with COPD were included. The PEDro scale was used to rate study quality. Standardized mean differences (effect sizes, ESs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were determined. Effects of included interventions were also measured according to the minimal important difference (MID) in daily steps for COPD (599 daily steps). RESULTS: A total of 37 RCTs with 4,314 participants (mean forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) % predicted 50.5 [SD=10.4]) were identified. Interventions including exercise training (ET; n=3 studies, 103 participants) significantly increased PA levels in COPD compared to standard care (ES [95% CI]; 0.84 [0.44-1.25]). The addition of activity counseling to pulmonary rehabilitation (PR; n=4 studies, 140 participants) showed important effects on PA levels compared to PR alone (0.47 [0.02-0.92]), achieving significant increases that exceeded the MID for daily steps in COPD (mean difference [95% CI], 1,452 daily steps [549-2,356]). Reporting of methodological quality was poor in most included RCTs. CONCLUSION: Interventions that included ET and PA counseling during PR were effective strategies to improve PA in COPD.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/16580
DOI: 10.2147/COPD.S121263
PubMed URL: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27994451
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Chronic obstructive
Interventions
Physical activity
Pulmonary disease
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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