Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/16439
Title: A randomised controlled trial of supplemental oxygen versus medical air during exercise training in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: supplemental oxygen in pulmonary rehabilitation trial (SuppORT) (Protocol)
Austin Authors: Alison, Jennifer A;McKeough, Zoe J;Jenkins, Sue C;Holland, Anne E ;Hill, Kylie;Morris, Norman R;Leung, Regina WM;Williamson, Kathleen A;Spencer, Lissa M;Hill, Catherine J ;Lee, Annemarie L;Seale, Helen;Cecins, Nola;McDonald, Christine F 
Affiliation: Discipline of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia
Department of Physiotherapy, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia
Institute for Respiratory Health, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Department of Physiotherapy, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Discipline of Physiotherapy, School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Physiotherapy, Alfred Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Institute for Breathing and Sleep, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Menzies Health Institute and School of Allied Health Sciences, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
The Queensland Lung Transplant Service, The Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Concord Repatriation General Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia
Department of Physiotherapy, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Department of Medicine, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: 4-Feb-2016
Publication information: BMC Pulmonary Medicine 2016; 16: 25
Abstract: Background: Oxygen desaturation during exercise is common in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of the study is to determine, in people with COPD who desaturate during exercise, whether supplemental oxygen during an eight-week exercise training program is more effective than medical air (sham intervention) in improving exercise capacity and health-related quality of life both at the completion of training and at six-month follow up. Methods/Design: This is a multi-centre randomised controlled trial with concealed allocation, blinding of participants, exercise trainers and assessors, and intention-to-treat analysis. 110 people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who demonstrate oxygen desaturation lower than 90 % during the six-minute walk test will be recruited from pulmonary rehabilitation programs in seven teaching hospitals in Australia. People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on long term oxygen therapy will be excluded. After confirmation of eligibility and baseline assessment, participants will be randomised to receive either supplemental oxygen or medical air during an eight-week supervised treadmill and cycle exercise training program, three times per week for eight weeks, in hospital outpatient settings. Primary outcome measures will be endurance walking capacity assessed by the endurance shuttle walk test and health-related quality of life assessed by the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes will include peak walking capacity measured by the incremental shuttle walk test, dyspnoea via the Dyspnoea-12 questionnaire and physical activity levels measured over seven days using an activity monitor. All outcomes will be measured at baseline, completion of training and at six-month follow up. Discussion: Exercise training is an essential component of pulmonary rehabilitation for people with COPD. This study will determine whether supplemental oxygen during exercise training is more effective than medical air in improving exercise capacity and health-related quality of life in people with COPD who desaturate during exercise. Trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612000395831, 5th Jan,2012
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/16439
DOI: 10.1186/s12890-016-0186-4
PubMed URL: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26846438
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
Exercise training
Oxygen desaturation
Supplemental oxygen
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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