Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/13772
Title: Resting state functional connectivity in anorexia nervosa
Austin Authors: Phillipou, Andrea ;Abel, Larry A A;Castle, David J;Hughes, ME;Nibbs, RG;Gurvich, C;Rossell, Susan L
Affiliation: Department of Mental Health, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Department of Optometry & Vision Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Brain and Psychological Sciences Research Centre, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Department of Psychiatry, St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Faculty of Health Sciences, Australian Catholic University
Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, Monash University and The Alfred Hospital
Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Brain and Psychological Sciences Research Centre, Swinburne University of Technology
Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, Monash University and The Alfred Hospital
Issue Date: May-2016
metadata.dc.date: 2016-04-19
Publication information: Psychiatry research 2016; 251: 45-52
Abstract: Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a serious psychiatric illness characterised by a disturbance in body image, a fear of weight gain and significantly low body weight. The factors involved in the genesis and maintenance of AN are unclear, though the potential neurobiological underpinnings of the condition are of increasing interest. Through the investigation of functional connectivity of the brain at rest, information relating to neuronal communication and integration of information that may relate to behaviours and cognitive symptoms can be explored. The aim of this study was to investigate functional connectivity of the default mode network, and sensorimotor and visual networks in AN. 26 females with AN and 27 healthy control participants matched for age, gender and premorbid intelligence underwent a resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. Default mode network functional connectivity did not differ between groups. AN participants displayed reduced functional connectivity between the sensorimotor and visual networks, in comparison to healthy controls. This finding is discussed in terms of differences in visuospatial processing in AN and the distortion of body image experienced by these individuals. Overall, the findings suggest that sensorimotor and visual network connectivity may be related to visuospatial processing in AN, though, further research is required.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/13772
PubMed URL: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27111812
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Anorexia Nervosa
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Type of Clinical Study or Trial: Case Control Studies
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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