Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12752
Title: Quitting experiences and preferences for a future quit attempt: a study among inpatient smokers.
Austin Authors: Thomas, Dennis;Abramson, Michael J;Bonevski, Billie;Taylor, Simone E ;Poole, Susan G;Weeks, Gregory R;Dooley, Michael J;George, Johnson
Affiliation: School of Medicine & Public Health, Faculty of Health & Medicine, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia
Department of Epidemiology & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, The Alfred, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Centre for Medicine Use and Safety, Monash University (Parkville Campus), Parkville, Victoria, Australia Pharmacy Department, Barwon Health, Geelong, Victoria, Australia
Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Centre for Medicine Use and Safety, Monash University (Parkville Campus), Parkville, Victoria, Australia Pharmacy Department, The Alfred, Prahran, Victoria, Australia
Pharmacy Department, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Centre for Medicine Use and Safety, Monash University (Parkville Campus), Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: 17-Apr-2015
Publication information: BMJ Open 2015; 5(4): e006959
Abstract: Understanding smokers' quit experiences and their preferences for a future quit attempt may aid in the development of effective cessation treatments. The aims of this study were to measure tobacco use behaviour; previous quit attempts and outcomes; methods used to assist quitting; difficulties experienced during previous attempts; the motives and preferred methods to assist quitting in a future attempt; identify the factors associated with preferences for smoking cessation.Face-to-face interview using a structured questionnaire.Inpatient wards of three Australian public hospitals.Hospitalised smokers enrolled in a smoking cessation trial.Of 600 enrolled patients (42.8% participation rate), 64.3% (n=386) had attempted quitting in the previous 12 months. On a scale of 1 (low) to 10 (high), current motivation to quit smoking was high (median 9; IQR 6.5-10), but confidence was modest (median 5; IQR 3-8). Among 386 participants who reported past quit attempts, 69.9% (n=270) had used at least one cessation aid to assist quitting. Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) was most commonly stated (222, 57.5%), although the majority had used NRT for <4 weeks. Hypnotherapy was the most common (68, 17.6%) non-pharmacological treatment. Over 80% (n=311) experienced withdrawal symptoms; craving and irritability were commonly reported. Most participants (351, 58.5%) believed medications, especially NRT (322, 53.7%), would assist them to quit in the future. History of previous smoking cessation medication use was the only independent predictor of interest in using medications for a future quit attempt.The majority of smokers had attempted quitting in the previous 12 months; NRT was a popular cessation treatment, although it was not used as recommended by most. This suggests a need for assistance in the selection and optimal use of cessation aids for hospitalised smokers.Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12612000368831.
Gov't Doc #: 25888475
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12752
DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006959
URL: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25888475
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: PREVENTIVE MEDICINE
PUBLIC HEALTH
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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