Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12719
Title: The role of anaerobes in diabetic foot infections.
Austin Authors: Charles, Patrick G P ;Uçkay, Ilker;Kressmann, Benjamin;Emonet, Stéphane;Lipsky, Benjamin A
Affiliation: Orthopaedic Surgery Service, Geneva University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland.
Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia
Laboratory of Bacteriology, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland.
Department of Infectious Diseases, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Division of Medical Sciences (Infectious Diseases), University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
Infectious Diseases Service, Geneva University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland
Infection Control Program, Geneva University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland.
Orthopaedic Surgery Service, Geneva University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland
Issue Date: 2-Apr-2015
Publication information: Anaerobe 2015; 34(): 8-13
Abstract: Diabetic foot infections (DFI) are a common cause of morbidity and, on occasion, even mortality. Infection can be either mono- or polymicrobial, with a wide variety of potential pathogens. Anaerobes may be involved, particularly in wounds that are deeper or more chronic, and are more frequently identified when using modern molecular techniques, such as 16s PCR and pyrosequencing. It remains unclear whether the presence of anaerobes in DFI leads to more severe manifestations, or if these organisms are largely colonizers associated with the presence of greater degrees of tissue ischemia and necrosis. Commonly used empiric antibiotic therapy for diabetic foot infections is generally broad-spectrum and usually has activity against the most frequently identified anaerobes, such as Peptostreptococcus and Bacteroides species. Adequate surgical debridement and, when needed, foot revascularization may be at least as important as the choice of antibiotic to achieve a successful treatment outcome.
Gov't Doc #: 25841893
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12719
DOI: 10.1016/j.anaerobe.2015.03.009
URL: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25841893
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Anaerobes
Bacteria
Diabetes mellitus
Diabetic foot infection
Infection
Ulcer
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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