Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/19683
Title: Outcomes following resection of non-small cell lung cancer in octogenarians.
Authors: Vazirani, Jaideep;Moraes, Johanna;Barnett, Stephen A;Johnson, Douglas F;Knight, Simon;Miller, Alistair;Wright, Gavin;Alam, Naveed Z;Conron, Matthew;Irving, Louis B;Antippa, Phillip;Steinfort, Daniel P
Affiliation: Department of Cancer Medicine, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Monash Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Thoracic Surgery, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Division of Cancer Surgery, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Surgery, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Medicine, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: 2-Oct-2018
EDate: 2018-10-02
Citation: ANZ journal of surgery 2018; online first: 2 October
Abstract: The treatment of choice for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is surgical resection. Little is known about the short- and long-term outcomes among very elderly patients. We sought to determine predictors of short- and long-term survival among octogenarians undergoing curative-intent resection for NSCLC in Victoria, Australia. We retrospectively reviewed data from all patients aged ≥80 years who underwent curative-intent resection for NSCLC over 12 years (January 2005-December 2016) across five tertiary centres. We examined effect of age, stage of disease, extent of surgery and lung function on short- and long-term survival. Two hundred patients aged ≥80 years underwent curative-intent resections. Mortality at 30 and 120 days was 2.9% and 5.9%, respectively. Increased early mortality was observed among those ≥83 years, at 30 days (6.8% versus 0.8%, P = 0.044) and 120 days (12.2% versus 2.3%, P = 0.0096). Early mortality was highest among patients ≥83 years requiring lobectomy, compared to sub-lobar resection at 120 days (17% versus 3.8%, P = 0.019). Long-term survival was predicted by age and stage of disease. Among patients with Stage I disease aged <83 years, lobectomy was associated with superior 5-year survival, compared to sub-lobar resection (83% versus 61%, P = 0.02). In carefully selected elderly patients undergoing curative-intent resection of early stage NSCLC, both short- and long-term outcomes appear consistent with younger historical cohorts. Early mortality was associated with lobectomy in those with advanced age. Older patients undergoing lobectomy appeared to be at highest risk for early mortality, while younger patients with Stage I disease undergoing at least lobectomy appear to have the best long-term survival.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/19683
DOI: 10.1111/ans.14861
ORCID: 0000-0002-6185-892X
PubMed URL: 30277303
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: non-small cell lung cancer
octogenarian
survival
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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