Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/19576
Title: Treatable traits can be identified in a severe asthma registry and predict future exacerbations.
Authors: McDonald, Vanessa M;Hiles, Sarah A;Godbout, Krystelle;Harvey, Erin S;Marks, Guy B;Hew, Mark;Peters, Matthew;Bardin, Philip G;Reynolds, Paul N;Upham, John W;Baraket, Melissa;Bhikoo, Zaheerodin;Bowden, Jeffrey;Brockway, Ben;Chung, Li Ping;Cochrane, Belinda;Foxley, Gloria;Garrett, Jeffrey;Jayaram, Lata;Jenkins, Christine;Katelaris, Constance;Katsoulotos, Gregory;Koh, Mariko S;Kritikos, Vicky;Lambert, Marina;Langton, David;Lara Rivero, Alexis;Middleton, Peter G;Nanguzgambo, Aldoph;Radhakrishna, Naghmeh;Reddel, Helen;Rimmer, Janet;Southcott, Anne Marie;Sutherland, Michael F;Thien, Francis;Wark, Peter A B;Yang, Ian A;Yap, Elaine;Gibson, Peter G
Affiliation: UQ Thoracic Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Chermside, QLD, Australia
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Eastern Health and Monash University, Box Hill, VIC, Australia
The Prince Charles Hospital, Metro North Hospital and Health Service, Chermside West, QLD, Australia
Centre of Excellence in Severe Asthma and Priority Research Centre for Healthy Lungs, Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia
Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada
Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, John Hunter Hospital, New Lambton Heights, NSW, Australia
South Western Sydney Clinical School, UNSW Sydney, Liverpool, NSW, Australia
Woolcock Institute of Medical Research, The University of Sydney, Glebe, NSW, Australia
Difficult Asthma Clinic, Allergy, Asthma and Clinical Immunology, Alfred Health, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Department of Thoracic Medicine, Concord Hospital, Concord, NSW, Australia
Lung and Sleep Medicine, Monash University and Medical Centre, Clayton, VIC, Australia
Department of Lung Research, Hanson Institute, Adelaide, SA, Australia
Department of Thoracic Medicine, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, SA, Australia
The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Woolloongabba, QLD, Australia
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, QLD, Australia
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Liverpool Hospital and School of Medicine, UNSW Sydney, Liverpool, NSW, Australia
Respiratory Department, Waikato Hospital, Hamilton, New Zealand
Department of Respiratory, Allergy and Sleep Medicine, Flinders Medical Centre, Bedford Park, SA, Australia
Department of Medicine, Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Fiona Stanley Hospital, Murdoch, WA, Australia
Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Campbelltown Hospital, Campbelltown, NSW, Australia
School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, Campbelltown, NSW, Australia
Respiratory Department, Middlemore Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand
Department of Medicine, Melbourne Clinical School, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Department of Respiratory and Sleep Disorders Medicine, Western Health, Footscray, VIC, Australia
Concord Clinical School and Respiratory Discipline, University of Sydney, Concord, NSW, Australia
Respiratory Group, The George Institute for Global Health, Newtown, NSW, Australia
Respiratory Medicine, UNSW Sydney, Liverpool, NSW, Australia
Immunology Department, Campbelltown Hospital, Campbelltown, NSW, Australia
St George Specialist Centre, Kogarah, NSW, Australia
Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore
Duke - National University Singapore Medical School, Singapore
Woolcock Institute of Medical Research, Quality Use of Respiratory Medicines, The University of Sydney, Glebe, NSW, Australia
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW, Australia
Respiratory Services, MidCentral Health, Palmerston North Hospital, Palmerston North, New Zealand
Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, VIC, Australia
Department of Thoracic Medicine, Frankston Hospital, Frankston, VIC, Australia
Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia
Ludwig Engel Centre for Respiratory Research, Westmead Institute of Medical Research, Westmead, NSW, Australia
Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW, Australia
Thoracic Medicine, St Vincent's Clinic, Darlinghurst, NSW, Australia
Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: 19-Sep-2018
EDate: 2018-09-19
Citation: Respirology 2018; online first; 19 September
Abstract: A new taxonomic and management approach, termed treatable traits, has been proposed for airway diseases including severe asthma. This study examined whether treatable traits could be identified using registry data and whether particular treatable traits were associated with future exacerbation risk. The Australasian Severe Asthma Web-Based Database (SAWD) enrolled 434 participants with severe asthma and a comparison group of 102 participants with non-severe asthma. Published treatable traits were mapped to registry data fields and their prevalence was described. Participants were characterized at baseline and every 6 months for 24 months. In SAWD, 24 treatable traits were identified in three domains: pulmonary, extrapulmonary and behavioural/risk factors. Patients with severe asthma expressed more pulmonary and extrapulmonary treatable traits than non-severe asthma. Allergic sensitization, upper-airway disease, airflow limitation, eosinophilic inflammation and frequent exacerbations were common in severe asthma. Ten traits predicted exacerbation risk; among the strongest were being prone to exacerbations, depression, inhaler device polypharmacy, vocal cord dysfunction and obstructive sleep apnoea. Treatable traits can be assessed using a severe asthma registry. In severe asthma, patients express more treatable traits than non-severe asthma. Traits may be associated with future asthma exacerbation risk demonstrating the clinical utility of assessing treatable traits.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/19576
DOI: 10.1111/resp.13389
PubMed URL: 30230137
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: co-morbidity
exacerbation
registry
severe asthma
treatable traits
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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