Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/17957
Title: The Importance of Residual Kidney Function in Haemodialysis Patients.
Authors: Kong, Jessica;Davies, Matthew;Mount, Peter F
Affiliation: Department of Nephrology, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Department of Medicine, Austin Health, The University of Melbourne, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Institute for Breathing and Sleep (Kidney Laboratory), Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: 2018
EDate: 2018-06-19
Citation: Nephrology (Carlton) 2018; online first: 19 Jun
Abstract: In contrast to peritoneal dialysis, residual kidney function is commonly disregarded for haemodialysis patients, and not regularly monitored or taken into account in routine clinical care. This is despite evidence that higher levels of residual kidney function in haemodialysis patients associate with better outcomes including survival, total solute clearance, nutrition, inflammation, and fluid balance. This review aims to summarise the clinical effects of residual kidney function specifically in haemodialysis patients. Some level of residual kidney function is present in over 80% of patients at the time of dialysis initiation, and while this declines over time, up to 30% of patients on haemodialysis for 5 years still have a measurable level of native kidney function. There is little evidence on how best to preserve residual kidney function in haemodialysis patients, although it has been observed that intensive haemodialysis regimens in incident haemodialysis patients appear to accelerate residual kidney function decline. Residual kidney function is not commonly factored in to haemodialysis prescription and measures of adequacy, despite the fact that some guidelines such as KDOQI and European Best Practice Guidelines suggest that it is reasonable to do. This likely relates, at least in part, to perceived concerns regarding the inconvenience of timed urine collections, and to the complexity and lack of consensus regarding the methods for integrating the intermittent clearance of haemodialysis with the continuous clearance of native renal function. Further research is required into how best to maintain and maximise the benefits of residual kidney function in haemodialysis patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/17957
DOI: 10.1111/nep.13427
ORCID: 0000-0001-7637-3661
PubMed URL: 29920874
Type: Journal Article
Review
Subjects: end stage renal failure
haemodialysis
incremental haemodialysis
residual kidney function
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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