Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/10407
Title: Neuropsychological study of underweight and "weight-recovered" anorexia nervosa compared with bulimia nervosa and normal controls.
Authors: Bosanac, Peter;Kurlender, Simone;Stojanovska, Lillian;Hallam, Karen;Norman, Trevor R;McGrath, Caroline;Burrows, Graham D;Wesnes, Keith;Manktelow, Tamsin;Olver, James S
Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Austin Hospital, Studley Road, Heidelberg 3084, Melbourne, Australia. bosanacp@unimelb.edu.au
Issue Date: 1-Nov-2007
Citation: The International Journal of Eating Disorders; 40(7): 613-21
Abstract: To compare executive, memory and visuospatial functioning of DSM-IV anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and normal controls (NC).A comparison of women involving: (i) 16 AN with body mass indices (BMI) < or = 17.5 kg/m(2); (ii) 12 AN with BMI > 18.5 kg/m(2) for at least 3 months; (iii) 13 BN; and (iv) 16 NC participants was performed with groups of similar age and intelligence. Groups were assessed with EDE-12, MADRS, HAMA, Cognitive Drug Research (CDR) battery, and Bechara tasks.Significant impairments in CDR Power of Attention were present in underweight AN and BN participants. CDR Morse Tapping was significantly impaired in all clinical groups. The BN and weight-recovered AN groups were significantly impaired on CDR immediate word recall. The BN group alone was significantly impaired on CDR delayed word recall.Attentional impairment is similar in AN and BN. Impaired motor tasks in AN persist after "weight-recovery" and are similar to impairments in BN. BN may be discriminated from AN on word recall.
Internal ID Number: 17607697
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/10407
DOI: 10.1002/eat.20412
URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17607697
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Adult
Anorexia Nervosa.psychology.rehabilitation
Australia.epidemiology
Body Weight
Bulimia Nervosa.psychology
Cognition Disorders.etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Memory
Space Perception
Thinness
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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